Shep's Place Family Tree

Zillis VON NUETT  ‎(I675)‎
Given Names: Zillis
Surname: VON NUETT

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: Yes
Death: 1461 Aix-La-Chapelle, Prussia, Germany
Personal Facts and Details
BirthYes
Biographical Notes


Hide Details Source: The History of The Family von Nida
Publication: Columbus, Ohio, 1966
Citation Details:  Page 6


Hide Details Note: ‎[Second Generation]‎ Zillis von Nuett: The son of one of these Nuett was Zillis von Nuett. Zillis owned much property in Aix-la-Chapelle. He married "Styne"-Zillis Huisfraw van Nuette--and died in 1461. "Up Kumphuysbat" at the Koelnmitteltor, near the inner city wall, were three houses next to each other in 1450 "near Reinart Rebens bathhouse" which at that time belonged to Zillis von Nuett. The name "Zillis van Nuette" sold these houses on October 16, 1456 to Johna von dem Heyden, and, because of obtaining an allodial condition, placed his house in St. Peter's street between his other house and Kittelvois ‎(rois)‎ house. The heirs of von dem Heyden sold the houses on April 25, 1458 to the bathhouse proprietor Cornelius van Elmpt ‎(?)‎, from whom they received the present name "Cornelius-Badf".

Nearby, before the Koelner Mitteltor, toward the outer gate, Zillis von Nut had an estate in 1450, between "Cronelius erve" and Loifstatt and "Herrn Ansems erve". Zillis had purchased this property from Arnold v. Diependael. The above mentioned "other house" of Zillis was located on Peter street. The county records mention two houses under his name, the one beside "Mettel Ansems erve Kittelvois" with a connecting courtyard, the other inheritance immediately beside it and next to Thys Radermacher. These houses were under the same roof, a method of building which is still noticeable in old houses of Aix-la-Chapelle. This was not the entire extent of the property of Zillis von Nut. A short distance west of the St. Peter's church toward the city gate, on Peter's street, he owned a house whose previous owner was the late person named Spiegel. This house with its courtyard was situated between Clais Irreganks heirs and Johann Herderscheit. Zillis held a mortgage on another von Nuett estate, which became a possession of Michel von Monchengladback and on October 23, 1485 became the property of Cornelius von Guelpen.

Historical Notes


Hide Details Source: The History of The Family von Nida
Publication: Columbus, Ohio, 1966
Citation Details:  Page 4


Hide Details Note: Aix-la-Chapelle ‎(Aachen)‎ was called Aquisgranum in early history. It began to be important when Charlemagne made it one of his places of residence, and directed the occurrences and fortunes of the Orient from there. When it became the place of coronation for German emperors, it became important to the rest of the world. A city developed which was rich according to the standards of those days and through which much commerce passed. As an important center of Christianity, it also became the goal of many pilgrimages, and was soon called a second Rome. At that time the building of permanent houses began. Beside the famous residence of the emperor, many other magnificent buildings were erected. The city was still under the rule of the governor, but already in 1192 we find in addition tot he governor, also a mayor and sheriff. This would indicate that a permanent civil government had been organized. An archive of Frederick II was of great importance according to which all persons born in Aix-la-chapelle, as well as strangers making it their home, should be forever freemen and could never be made fiefs, or slaves. Such a charter of liberty attracted many people, especially since other privileges were granted to inhabitants of Aix by this emperor. The people had various occupations, but the manufacture of textiles was very important.

Towards the end of the fourteenth century the city had recuperated from the effects of the plague which had decimated the population. The textile industry soon brought prosperity back again. At this time several Nuett were living in the city.

The sixteenth century brought to Aix great religious disturbances. Albert Muenster, the first speaker of the new faith, was, according to annalists of the city, a murderer, and was publicly executed. In 1530 the city remained true to the Catholic faith at Augsburg. The axiom "cuius regio, eius religio" ‎(He that has the rule determines the faith)‎ was also applied to Aix, and the heterodox were given a respite, usually one year and six months, to make provisions for their property and to emigrate. When in 1533, a person who claimed to be a Lutheran clergyman, held secret meetings in the home of Lorenz Teschenmacher, the council arrested him and his audience. In 1534 the council again forbade the exposition of the Gospel. Prominent citizens, among them many cloth merchants, secretly remained faithful to the new doctrine. When this new faith continued to grow, especially among persons of rank, it became known, and on July 10, 1550 Ferdinand I ordered an investigation regarding the spread of the Lutheran faith. Several citizens were exiled. When some of them returned, contrary to the orders from the council, and held meetings at night, several were publicly burned. When the princes and noblemen who subscribed to the Augsburg Confession intervened, the council still remained firm. As late as August 30, 1559 Protestants were arrested because of their secret meetings. While several prominent members of the council spoke favourably of the new doctrine, the expulsions continued, easing first with the exile of the mayor Adam von Zeuell on May 15, 1560. We know that at this time our ancestors, who had accepted the new faith, had already left Aix. In 1581 Protestants were strong enough to control the city. Then the imperial proscription struck them after several unheeded admonitions, and more than a hundred citizens, among them Peter von Nuet, were banned. A long time later the city finally recuperated from the effects of these disturbances.

The wealth and splendour of the great capital of the empire undoubtedly lured our ancestors to it. The immigration probably happened early in the Middle Ages, since at that time the Nuett were well to do. Exact dates are difficult to gather, since in the great fire ‎(1656)‎ of the city many valuable documents were lost.

Death 1461 Aix-La-Chapelle, Prussia, Germany

Last Change 16 August 2008 - 14:02:13 - by: Administrator
View Details for ...


Immediate Family  (F256)
‎(unknown)‎ UNKNOWN
-
Heinrich VON NUETT
-


Notes
Biographical Notes ‎[Second Generation]‎ Zillis von Nuett: The son of one of these Nuett was Zillis von Nuett. Zillis owned much property in Aix-la-Chapelle. He married "Styne"-Zillis Huisfraw van Nuette--and died in 1461. "Up Kumphuysbat" at the Koelnmitteltor, near the inner city wall, were three houses next to each other in 1450 "near Reinart Rebens bathhouse" which at that time belonged to Zillis von Nuett. The name "Zillis van Nuette" sold these houses on October 16, 1456 to Johna von dem Heyden, and, because of obtaining an allodial condition, placed his house in St. Peter's street between his other house and Kittelvois ‎(rois)‎ house. The heirs of von dem Heyden sold the houses on April 25, 1458 to the bathhouse proprietor Cornelius van Elmpt ‎(?)‎, from whom they received the present name "Cornelius-Badf".

Nearby, before the Koelner Mitteltor, toward the outer gate, Zillis von Nut had an estate in 1450, between "Cronelius erve" and Loifstatt and "Herrn Ansems erve". Zillis had purchased this property from Arnold v. Diependael. The above mentioned "other house" of Zillis was located on Peter street. The county records mention two houses under his name, the one beside "Mettel Ansems erve Kittelvois" with a connecting courtyard, the other inheritance immediately beside it and next to Thys Radermacher. These houses were under the same roof, a method of building which is still noticeable in old houses of Aix-la-Chapelle. This was not the entire extent of the property of Zillis von Nut. A short distance west of the St. Peter's church toward the city gate, on Peter's street, he owned a house whose previous owner was the late person named Spiegel. This house with its courtyard was situated between Clais Irreganks heirs and Johann Herderscheit. Zillis held a mortgage on another von Nuett estate, which became a possession of Michel von Monchengladback and on October 23, 1485 became the property of Cornelius von Guelpen.
Historical Notes Aix-la-Chapelle ‎(Aachen)‎ was called Aquisgranum in early history. It began to be important when Charlemagne made it one of his places of residence, and directed the occurrences and fortunes of the Orient from there. When it became the place of coronation for German emperors, it became important to the rest of the world. A city developed which was rich according to the standards of those days and through which much commerce passed. As an important center of Christianity, it also became the goal of many pilgrimages, and was soon called a second Rome. At that time the building of permanent houses began. Beside the famous residence of the emperor, many other magnificent buildings were erected. The city was still under the rule of the governor, but already in 1192 we find in addition tot he governor, also a mayor and sheriff. This would indicate that a permanent civil government had been organized. An archive of Frederick II was of great importance according to which all persons born in Aix-la-chapelle, as well as strangers making it their home, should be forever freemen and could never be made fiefs, or slaves. Such a charter of liberty attracted many people, especially since other privileges were granted to inhabitants of Aix by this emperor. The people had various occupations, but the manufacture of textiles was very important.

Towards the end of the fourteenth century the city had recuperated from the effects of the plague which had decimated the population. The textile industry soon brought prosperity back again. At this time several Nuett were living in the city.

The sixteenth century brought to Aix great religious disturbances. Albert Muenster, the first speaker of the new faith, was, according to annalists of the city, a murderer, and was publicly executed. In 1530 the city remained true to the Catholic faith at Augsburg. The axiom "cuius regio, eius religio" ‎(He that has the rule determines the faith)‎ was also applied to Aix, and the heterodox were given a respite, usually one year and six months, to make provisions for their property and to emigrate. When in 1533, a person who claimed to be a Lutheran clergyman, held secret meetings in the home of Lorenz Teschenmacher, the council arrested him and his audience. In 1534 the council again forbade the exposition of the Gospel. Prominent citizens, among them many cloth merchants, secretly remained faithful to the new doctrine. When this new faith continued to grow, especially among persons of rank, it became known, and on July 10, 1550 Ferdinand I ordered an investigation regarding the spread of the Lutheran faith. Several citizens were exiled. When some of them returned, contrary to the orders from the council, and held meetings at night, several were publicly burned. When the princes and noblemen who subscribed to the Augsburg Confession intervened, the council still remained firm. As late as August 30, 1559 Protestants were arrested because of their secret meetings. While several prominent members of the council spoke favourably of the new doctrine, the expulsions continued, easing first with the exile of the mayor Adam von Zeuell on May 15, 1560. We know that at this time our ancestors, who had accepted the new faith, had already left Aix. In 1581 Protestants were strong enough to control the city. Then the imperial proscription struck them after several unheeded admonitions, and more than a hundred citizens, among them Peter von Nuet, were banned. A long time later the city finally recuperated from the effects of these disturbances.

The wealth and splendour of the great capital of the empire undoubtedly lured our ancestors to it. The immigration probably happened early in the Middle Ages, since at that time the Nuett were well to do. Exact dates are difficult to gather, since in the great fire ‎(1656)‎ of the city many valuable documents were lost.

View Notes for ...


Sources
Biographical Notes The History of The Family von Nida
Publication: Columbus, Ohio, 1966
Citation Details:  Page 6
Historical Notes The History of The Family von Nida
Publication: Columbus, Ohio, 1966
Citation Details:  Page 4

View Sources for ...


Media
There are no media objects for this individual.
View Media for ...


Close Relatives
Family with ‎(unknown)‎ UNKNOWN
Zillis VON NUETT ‎(I675)‎
Birth Yes
Death 1461 Aix-La-Chapelle, Prussia, Germany
Wife
#1
Son