Shep's Place Family Tree

Allen WILSON
1875 Allen Wilson
Allen WILSON  ‎(I5761)‎
Given Names: Allen
Surname: WILSON

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 6 April 1820 45 29 England
Death: 6 January 1890 ‎(Age 69)‎ South Australia, Australia
Personal Facts and Details
Birth 6 April 1820 45 29 England

Marriage Ellen McLeod REEVES - 15 February 1843 ‎(Age 22)‎ Ludlow House, Gumeracha, South Australia, Australia

Biographical Notes

Hide Details Note: For Allen's Mother to have been buried at St. James, Piccadilly, London indicates that the Wilsons resided in that parish. At which school Allen received his early education is not now known, but his son Osmond having just a few remembrances of his father's remarks contacted King's School, Canterbury in 1920 as did E.M.S. in 1987 for confirmation and hoping for more detail of Allen's attendance. It was not forthcoming that is, to detail. Kings' School is said to be the oldest in England, being founded at Canterbury in 600 A.D. Osmond obtained a photograph, an embroidered blazer pocket with the school emblem, and a letter from the headmaster.

From: A. Latter, Head Master,
King's School, Canterbury.
reply dated 25 Apr 1920
To: Mr. Osmond Wilson.
Dear Sir, I have looked up Allen Wilson in our records which show as follows: Allen Wilson, son of Christopher Wilson, Purser, retired, R.N. Entered school Oct. 11, 1831, aged 11 years. Born at Lydd, Kent on April 6, 1820. Admitted to King's Scholarship Xmas 1832. Left school midsummer 1835 aged 15 years.
Yrs. truly Algernon Latter.

There is a school magazine with some of the school's history with the memorabilia collected by Osmond Wilson and now held by E.M.S. With the death of his father, Allen came under the guardianship of his mother's eldest brother, Captain William Allen ‎(1790 - 1856)‎ whose interesting life story is part of the Allen history. The captain retired from the East India Company's Navy in 1836. By the following year Allen was "walking the boards" at Guy's Hospital as a start to his proposed career as a doctor, even though he was only 17. That was the custom, with medical school and examinations in the years ahead. The primitive wards for poverty stricken patients, no antiseptics, no trained nurses, no anaesthetics or even reasonable cleanliness must have been an unpleasant shock to a boy brought up in comfortable circumstances.

Uncle William had returned from his adventurous life at sea a wealthy man and had no interest in the farm at Lydd. This he sold as both his parents had died, though one story is that he gave it to the farm manager as a gift, in any case, he parted with the Lydd property, set up his youngest brother Charles in business at Bristol, and after consulting with his special friend Captain John Ellis newly retired from the Royal Navy, looked about for something to interest them both. Captain Ellis' wife had recently died and although their 8 children had to be safely settled he felt free to join in any enterprise suggested by Capt. Allen. Opportunity beckoned from the other end of the world at the newly founded colony of South Australia and in 1838 the two captains decided to investigate prospects there.

That they sent the 17 year old Allen Wilson ahead to spy out the conditions seems an odd thing. Perhaps they merely wanted to get him out of the way. According to Osmond Wilson his father "left Guy's Hospital without completing his degree" and considering Allen's youth this was not surprising. Also, said Osmond, Allen joined a party which was about to embark on the "Duke of Roxburgh" which left St. Katherine's Docks, London on March 31st. The ship was of 416 tons and the commander was Captain Thomson. Allen's children said that he travelled in the care of some relatives.

The largest party aboard was that of Thomas Wilson, a lawyer of London, who was descended from Oliver Cromwell through his mother. His father George Wilson was a doctor as were several others in the family tree. However descendants of the present day deny any connection with Allen Wilson, it therefore seems only coincidence concerning the two surnames. In "Bridge over the Ocean" by S.C. Wilson and Keith Borrow, published in 1973 there is some account of the voyage by 20 year old Charles, son of Thomas, but no mention of Allen. The Thomas Wilsons joined the ship 3 days later at Gravesend ‎(on April 3)‎. The ship was some two miles off shore so they had to be rowed out to her, then climb up a rope ladder on the side of the vessel. Mrs. Wilson was hoisted up in a bosun's chair with daughter Agnes in her lap. Of the 8 children of Thomas and Martha only 5 accompanied them. Charles wrote that the chair was of a particular construction and wrapped around with the British colours. They also had some servants. Next day they sailed "with a fair wind about quarter to six". Allen was on his way to South Australia.

Charles went on to say that there were 3 dozen sheep on board for food on the voyage beside those belonging to passengers in the Cabin ‎(the first class)‎, two goats ‎(and a kid)‎ for milk for their tea but no cow. There were 4 dogs, "our greyhound which is the best dog on board", a large bull mastiff, a small white bitch and a Scotch terrier. Then on each side of the poop, all the way along were coops of fowls, about a hundred of them, the rest plus geese were on the larboard side as well as ducks and two dozen pigs. So Allen was in the midst of something of a Noah's Ark. Mr. de Horn played the flute as did Mr. Holthouse. Mr. Philcox and Mr. Edmonds played the horn, so that they often had duets, very pleasant and well played, with the passengers joining in singing choruses, the National Anthem, Rule Britannia etc. If Allen was as tone deaf as a number of his descendants it is to be hoped that he refrained from taking part. Charles was a naturalist by inclination and remarked fish, porpoises, nautilus shells in a flotilla, sailing by, but nothing else of his fellow travellers and his early enthusiasm for recording in his diary had petered out by the time the ship had reached the Canary Islands. A great storm was encountered in June as they rounded the Cape of Good Hope and Charles wrote a poem about it which in later years appeared in the "South Australian Magazine".

None of the new colonists had the least idea of the conditions that awaited them at the end of their voyage of four months which ended on July 28, 1838. Kangaroo Island had been passed and Mt. Lofty rising above the plain of the mainland had come into view. There was no pilot. to guide the vessel but the harbour having been discovered, the twisted way past the mangroves lining the river was accomplished to the Old Port. distinguished only by an iron store and two mud huts and swarms of mosquitoes and the novelty of black swans, pelicans, screaming cockatoos and other wild life was forgotten with the sudden discomforts facing the new arrivals. There was only one way to reach the shore, on the backs of wading sailors. Luggage was carried by servants or oneself through scrub covered sandhills and along the faintly discernable track which led to Adelaide about 8 miles to the east. There was no available transport and compasses were produced to ensure that no-one became lost in the scrub. So the company left Port Misery, Allen amongst them, and made its weary way to the town.

Arrival at Adelaide must have been a further shock. There were already 5000 inhabitants occupying the square mile which Colonel William Light had surveyed, and through it, scattered between the many trees, but facing whichever way the owner fancied, was a town of packing case villas with pork barrel chimneys, tents of calico or tarpaulin and huts of mud and reeds, with a very few prefabricated Manning houses brought from London ready to be erected. The first Governor, Capt. John Hindmarsh had just departed ‎(on July 16)‎ leaving the first Government House of rough timber, built by his Marines, minus a chimney at first, on the bank of the River Torrens, with the dwellings of other officials nearby. Here Thomas Wilson and his family lived at first, but soon removed to a Mannin house at North Adelaide, ADELAIDE, SOUTH AUSTRALIA.

Allen had his 18th birthday during the voyage. Where he lived during the months before his uncle and Capt. Ellis arrived can only be guessed at. There is a strong possibility that he went to a primitive inn among the gum trees of Franklin Street where the recently married young publican was Oscar John Lines from Harpenden, Hertfordshire. Oscar and Allen remained lifelong friends and between them arranged marriages between some of their children. How Allen filled his days is another mystery. Perhaps chasing the wallabies and kangaroos that still haunted the "city" streets.

In due course the two captains arrived on March 21, 1839, in what was then considered luxury, aboard the "Buckinghamshire" of 1468 tons, commanded by Capt. Thomson. Having agreed to become partners in whatever venture was decided upon, they had purchased their first land by the following October. This was 2000 acres at Port Gawler. The sale was registered on 25 Oct 1839. The previous owner was George Milner Stephen, a son-in-law of Governor Hindmarsh, and in his absence, Acting Governor. This land was known as the Milner Estate. Stephen was intent on making a fortune and speculating in land. He advertised in May 1839 that a 4 ton schooner rigged deck sailing vessel plied from Pt. Adelaide every Wednesday and Saturday by George Prince, to the Gawler River ‎(it was also referred to as the Para)‎, to visit the Milner Estate which was for sale This would have been the mode of conveyances for Allen Wilson, his uncle and Captain Ellis. Stephen had paid 400 pounds for 4000 acres. He charged the captains 10,000 pounds for their 2000 acres When they discovered that they should not have paid more than one pound per acre they were naturally infuriated.

Presently a court case ensued. Published accounts stated that the captains purchased two thirds of the Milner Estate. However it was their misfortune in thus being cheated and there was no reparation. The partners added considerably to their holding in this area until they owned in excess of 17,000 acres and 2 miles of water frontage ‎(of the river)‎. Allen took part in these early occurrences. There were to be eventually 6 houses on this land and the first, and no doubt a very simple one, was on an eminence overlooking the river. It was built of English bricks used as ballast in the two ships owned by Captain Ellis and used to bring out stock, household furnishing etc. Captain Ellis remarried Susannah, the eldest daughter of Governor Sir John Hindmarsh ‎(and had further family)‎.

The large house, finished by 1843 where Allen and Ellen lived was named "Buckland Park". Some printed accounts give that this derived from Captain Allen's English home. This is not so as he originated from Lydd He remained a bachelor.

It is believed in the Wilson family that Ellen's eldest sister, Charlotte, who married her cousin Captain Thomas Buckland, was responsible for the name. When Charlotte married at Holy Trinity in 1840 she gave her address as Para River and formerly of Playden, Sussex. She must therefore have been living at "Buckland Park", perhaps as house-keeper at the first house erected on the property. Had Charlotte been with her parents her address would have been Gumeracha, ‎(or Timnath)‎.

That the Reeves and Aliens were related in an earlier generation was another family story of the Wilsons. If so, E.M.S. was unable to trace it. With an as yet very thinly spread population and Samuel Reeves Flockmaster for the South Australian Company, even without any family tie, the two households would have soon met, being in the same general area north of Adelaide. So it was to the fine large "Buckland Park" that Allen took his very young bride in February 1843 and according to Osmond Wilson the first four of their fifteen children were born there, however as the Wilsons were at Mt. Barker by 1845 only the first two were. Ellen Allen ‎(known as Nell)‎ Wilson arrived the following November. For the curious, 9 months and 3 days after the wedding, and she was then 17. Her 15th was born when she was 39 in 1865. Her photograph of about this time shows her to be slender, small and very pretty still. Her matron's cap was a mere wisp and her dark, rather plain crinoline had three flounces on the lower skirt and a matching jacket fell in peaks at its hemline. Whit cuffs and the high neckline softened by a lace ruffle threaded through with ribbon completed the picture.

Her life of ease at "Buckland Park" was not to last. Due to the stupidity of her young husband a future fortune and all aid from Captain Allen was lost in a few moments one hot summer day. As the Temperance people would have said, the Demon Drink was responsible for the disaster which led to the ousting of the Wilsons and their forced removal to Mt. Barker. The exact date is uncertain. By Osmond Wilson's reckoning it was 1849, but Land Titles records their Mt. Barker occupation as 1845 to 1901. One paper is dated 1847.

So far as Allen knew, Uncle William was safely in Adelaide, and he took himself to one of the wayside grog shops, mere huts on the most frequently used tracks, for refreshment and stayed too long. He became garrulous and shouted to the company that if he could get his hands on the old man's money bags he'd put him in the Workhouse. Uncle had

made an early return and had just stepped in to slake his own thirst from the dust of the roads, and thus learned at first hand his heir's opinion and ingratitude. It was the end of any possible inheritance. Allen was cut off without so much as the proverbial shilling.

There was but one place for them to go, Mt. Barker. Captain Allen had given Ellen, in her own right, three sections in the Mt. Barker Special Survey, as a wedding gift. Perhaps even then he had suspicions of his nephew. It is said that he was very fond of Ellen, but a wife's place was with her husband so she must suffer along with him. The Wilson children maintained that their father arrived in Australia with £30,000 which was undoubtedly an exaggeration. Even £3,000 seems an excessive sum, as Allen's father, Christopher, left an estate valued at only £100 and that to his 2nd wife. Any inheritance would have come from his Allen grandfather, via the estate of his deceased mother, Mary.

AT MOUNT BARKER

Tracing the early history of this land presents a tangled skein. Each section described singly makes a clearer picture. The two sections were in the Three ‎(Davenport)‎ Brothers Special Survey in the Hundred of Macclesfield. Section 3729 at Western Flat near Mr. Barker which came to be called "Old Westbrook" was originally purchased by J.B. Hack who sold to E.O. Philcox in 1840. Not the horn player of the "Duke of Roxburgh" voyage, but a doctor who arrived by the "John" with his wife on 4 Feb 1840. Dr. Philcox did not take to farming and advertised "To Let":- in Adelaide "Registers" from Sept. 17th to Nov. 5th 1842 on page 1....

"89 acres of excellent land, 20 acres enclosed and cultivated. Stone House nearly complete, 2 workmen's cottages, dairy, milking and stock yards. An excellent run and abundance of water throughout the year"

This section with two others ‎(to be described presently)‎ had a total of 349 acres. With wedding plans being made and no doubt advice from his uncle on 26 Aug 1842 Allen Wilson gave Dr. Philcox a mortgage of £1070 7 shillings at 10 percent per annum. Bargain and sale for one year. But a month later the mortgage was transferred to Captain William Allen and the place leased out for 12 months. This, and the other sections, were the subject of a pre-wedding settlement upon Ellen McLeod Reeves by the Captain and it was signed and witnessed on their wedding day of 15 Feb 1845. The document was handed over to lawyer Frederic Bayne and his partner Henry Johnson for registration, as they were appointed Trustees, but they failed to register it and this led to difficulties when Ellen died in 1901, but these were sorted out. A copy of this Memorial Deed is at Land Titles ‎(the Old Torrens Titles building register)‎ and another was at one time in a pocket of the leather cover of Osmond Wilson's album of the Wilson family now in the possession of E.M.S. The first tenant was Richard Eales Borrow from 1843 to 1854. The rent received was originally for Ellen's pin money, but became the main income for a long time as Allen, described always in Directories as "Gentleman" was said never to have done a days manual labour in his life. ‎(The Memorial Deed is No. 105B)‎.

"Old Westbrook" is still occupied and the word Westbrook scratched on front window with a diamond is still there too. "Old Westbrook" was never lived in by Allen, Ellen and their family, and when they left "Buckland Park" for Mt. Barker they went to Section 3717 on which there was a Manning pre-fabricated house brought out from England and which was to be known as "Westbrook Farm". Like Section 3729 at Western Flat this one was also first owned by J.B. Hack ‎(who erected the house)‎ and then by Dr. Philcox. It was described as "80 acres with posts and 3 and 4 rail fences, the Manning house, 3 huts for workers, stone dairy, stockyards etc." Hack had called it "Burnwath", changed to "Woodside" by Philcox and finally "Westbrook Farm" by the Wilsons. This property was 4 miles from Mt. Barker on the Macclesfield Road, and exactly opposite to the turn off to Echunga. The Manning house must have been one of the larger ones as it had two attic rooms, where according to Marion Wilson ‎(my grandmother, Mrs. C.P. Lakeman eventually)‎ apples were stored and many cored and sliced and strung on cords to dry and be used later for pies when apples were out of season.

Manning houses were erected at Blackiston near Mt. Barker by Capt. Francis Davison as well as many in the city. He seems to have been an agent for the district with a carpenter to put them up at a charge of 10 shillings a day plus meals. The English advertisement for these early prefabs. was by H. Manning, 251 High Holorn, London.

"The house is packed into a small compass and may be erected with windows, doors, locks and painted inside and out, floors, etc. Complete for habitation in a few hours after landing. Prices £15 pounds and upwards. They may be taken to pieces and moved as often as convenience of the settler may require. Manufactured on the most simple and approved principles". They varied in size from a single room to quite large dwellings. The Friends ‎(Quakers)‎ Meeting House at North Adelaide is the only example that has survived. What Mr. Manning failed to consider was the prevalence of termites in S.A. By the time Marion had grown up the timber "Westbrook Farm" had been invaded by them.

To quote Great Aunt Maude Wilson, sister of Marion, she could have put it together with a hairpin and the help of a strong boy. Her brother Osmond, already mentioned, made a romanticized sketch of this house, with gables and attic rooms and surrounding verandahs and rose arches in the garden. With parents, so large a family and room for guests it must have been fairly commodious. As already stated the Wilsons took up residence there in 1845 by the Lands Titles record, in which case the third child, Maria Louisa was born there in 1846 and died in 1849, and 12 more also saw the light of day at "Westbrook Farm".

A 3rd section of 3730, next door to "Old Westbrook" at Mt. Barker, was purchased on 13 Jan 1859 and was nearer to "Westbrook Farm" than Mt. Barker and here at a later date the third house ‎(of stone)‎ was built and known as "New Westbrook". So it would seem the Wilson acreage was approximately 430, and insufficient one would think to make a reasonable living. Also, in view of Allen's bankruptcy of 1850 it is a mystery as to how he could afford to purchase another section.

The name "Westbrook" seems to have derived from the great house at Lydd in the Romney Marsh, named "Westbroke". The Allen family was recorded there from the 15th century, that is at Lydd. They were farmers and graziers and amongst the better known families. The only connection with "Westbroke" Manor that research has brought to light concerns the marriage of Baker Coates ‎(licence dated 22 May 1764)‎ of New Romney who was a brother of Allen Wilson's great grandmother Ann Allen ‎(nee Coates)‎. The bride was Elizabeth Dering, daughter of Edward ‎(later Sir Edward, baronet)‎ of Surrenden Manor, Pluckley and Westbroke Manor Lydd, the latter being a secondary property of the Dering family. The connection seems to be a very remote one for Allen Wilson to be so obsessed with the Westbrook name, even lacking the final "e" and adding an extra "o".

Another possibility is the answer to the supposed Reeves/Allen connection previously mentioned. A cousin of Capt. William Allen ‎(and therefore also of Allen Wilson's mother)‎ was Thomas Shoosmith of Lydd who married Ann Terry, daughter of Stephen Terry, at Lydd in 1799. Then in 1833 Ann's niece Louisa Terry married John Reeves at Lydd. John was uncle of Allen Wilson's wife nee Ellen McLeod Reeves, and only brother of her father Samuel.

BANKRUKPTCY

Allen Wilson of Port Gawler, late of Mt. Barker became the creditor of John Morphett on 9 Mar 1843 and his attorney was Samuel Smart. No details were found. However it would appear that Allen was of Mt. Barker. even if briefly, before he married. Perhaps "Old Westbrook" was fleetingly his home. This money trouble was less than a month after his marriage. By 1850 he was in real financial trouble. He was insolvent as gazetted 16 Feb 1850 and again on 7 Aug 1850.

Schedule 1. "I, Allen Wilson of Westbrook in the District of Mt. Barker gentleman, do hereby declare that I am insolvent and unable to meet my engagements. Dated this Seventh day of August, one thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty. Signed in the presence of Charles Fenn, a practioner in the Supreme Court". Schedule 2 was missing from the record. Schedule 3. "A statement of the real and personal of Mr. Allen Wilson, Insolvent, made and filed in pursuance of the ordinances of the Legislative Council of the Province, relating to Insolvent Debtors, passed on 10 Jul 1845 signed Woods."

"Statement: "The insolvent has contingent interest in certain lands at Mt. Barker, expectant on the death of his wife and children".‎(Note: the wife was aged 23 and the children infants or nearly so)‎.
Personal estate:
4 cows and calves residing at the residence of Allen Wilson of Westbrook,
2 pigs. Debts due 9 pounds 10 shillings from J.E. Phillips. Signed William Fenn, solicitor.
List of articles prayed to be re-assigned under the provision of the ordinance now in force in the said Province concerning insolvent debtors.
1 cedar table - value 10/-
1 dressing table - value 10/-
1 small table - value 5/-
6 chairs - value 1pd.10/-
1 washstand - value 10/-
1 bedstead - value 10/-
1 iron bedstead - value 10/-
1 dressing glass - value 10/-
1 chamber set value 5/-
1 doz knives & forks value 5/-
1 harness crock - value 5/-
1 small do - value 4/-
3 buckets - value 6/-
1 wash tub - value 2/6
2 decanters - value 10/-
1 dressing case -value 10/-
1 gun case value 5/-
cooking utensils - value 1pd.
bedding - value 1pd.
2 mattresses - value 15/-
garden tools - value 5/-
2 leather trunks - value 10/-
1 portmanteau - value 5/-
Total value of these items 10 pounds, 17 shillings, and 6 pence

There is no doubt that Allen admitted only to a small portion of their belongings. E.M.S. has one of the heavy cut glass decanters, 3 of the set of 12 dessert plates with fruit motifs not mentioned, one fluted silver dessert spoon, one sterling silver teaspoon, one of a pair of heavy brass candlesticks and a pair of pink china candlesticks also not listed.

Clothing of Mrs. Ellen M. Wilson - total value 10 pounds, 17 shillings and 6 pence
3 print dresses - value 7/6
1 shawl - value 5/-
2 flannel petticoats -value 5/-
8 children's frocks -12/-
2 calico do - value 3/-
8 shifts - value 8/-
3 shifts - value 4/6
8 petticoats - value 8/-
1 pr. stays - value 2/-
4 pr. stockings - value 3/-
4 pr. shoes - value 4/-
4 pr. socks - value 2/-
1 pr. shoes - value 2/-
1 portmanteau - value 5/-

Perhaps it was too delicate a matter to mention a lady's drawers or baby napkins or caps etc. No bonnet for Ellen either. One can imagine making his lists by candle light and forgetting the baby's cradle or sets of dishes, even spoons and the all important carving knife. As 3 of the children were boys "frocks" would seem inappropriate until it is remembered that in those days small boys wore dresses until they were about 6.

Clothing of Mr. Allen Wilson - total value 17 pounds 1 shilling ‎($34.10)‎
2 coats - value 1 pound
4 pr. socks - value 2/-
2 pr. trousers - value 10/-
2 pr. drawers - value 2/-
2 waist coats - value 7/-
2 pr. boots - value 5/-
3 shirts - value 7/6
1 hat - value 2/-
2 pocket handkerchiefs 2/-

August 27th 1850 - Allen Wilson retained William Fenn to represent him. Fenn accepted. Schedule 243 Insolvencies. Allen Wilson on his own petition he being at large ‎(i.e. he was not in gaol for debt.)‎

September 13th 1850 - Allen Wilson was judged insolvent before the Court, but he refused even under oath to reveal all his estate. On that date also it was decided that a meeting of his creditors be held on Oct. 13th. October 13th 1850 - Debts in total were found to be 180 pounds. He declared under oath ‎(and no doubt lied in his teeth)‎ that his furniture was as scheduled.

October 31st - Final examination of Allen Wilson before the Court. April 1st 1851 - Fiat of Insolvency sworn.

At this point Ellen came near to losing her small estate of "Old Westbrook" and its adjoining section, leased out, and "Westbrook Farm" where they resided. Her lawyer Trustees had pocketed their fee but never registered the gift from Capt. William Allen. Johnson had departed to Victoria. Frederick Bayne, her brother-in-law, had "Bolted" to Tasmania after embezzling his clients' monies. There was no-one to prove on her behalf that she was the legal owner. Dr. John Rankine of Strathalbyn, M.P. for Mt. Barker came to her rescue as did Edward Stirling also of Strathalbyn.

When Ellen went to Adelaide to defend her right of ownership, she was laughed at by the learned gentlemen and told that they did not do business with little girls. She drew herself up to her full less than 5 feet and said with dignity, "I will have you know that I am a respectable married woman of 23 years of age and the mother of four children living." And that put the said gentlemen back in their boxes and they were impressed enough to take her claim seriously.

It was found that the missing Johnson and Bayne had deposited deeds they did not own as security, and few of their land transactions had been registered, including Ellen's, This was to cause further trouble at her death in 1901. For the present her claim was upheld and prevented the property from being seized and sold to pay Allen's debts. When all was settled satisfactorily, and 5 years later, new Trustees were appointed 12 Dec 1856. Nothing was hurried in those days. F. Bayne of Melbourne ‎(having left Tasmania and started a law practice again)‎ and Henry Johnson of Geelong, Victoria, were replaced by Edward Stirling of Strathalbyn and Lauchlin McFarlane of the "Oakfield Hotel", Mt. Barker. Ellen Wilson of Mt. Barker ‎(memo 113, Folio 260)‎ had a safe haven for her children. They had increased to 9 births with 8 living. Marion, the eighth, and source of many family tales, was not registered at Mt. Barker as were the others, when she arrived in 1854. The sons, 10 in all, were all important.

Allen's debts of 1850/1851 were to Captain John Ellis to whom he owed 37 pounds 10 shillings. To Captain William Allen, owed since 1647 ‎(which seems to point to this being the year the Wilsons left "Buckland Park", 17 pounds 10 shillings, and to others he was in debt 176 pounds 7 shillings and 11 pence. At the time the estate debt due from F. Bayne was 100 pounds but never paid. The rent from "Old Westbrook" brought only 143 pounds for 5 years and was paid to Ellen. What had been intended as her pin money by Uncle William Aller was family income. R.E. Borrow completed his lease in 1854 and a Mr. Arm-field was her next tenant but sub-let to a Mr. Jarrett. On April 9th 1856 it was leased for 8 years to John Knight for 60 pounds ($120)‎ per annum ‎(folio 273)‎.

These were hard years for Ellen both financially and physically. She who had done no household tasks when she married at 16 was forced to even make shoes for the children. Tacks being unavailable she whittled small wooden pegs for the same purpose. The eldest daughter, Nell, was of an age to give some household help but there was no mention of servants in the family annals apart from the midwife from Mt. Barker who usually stayed a month. There were farm labourers because Allen had no will to work. The registration of the 9th child, at Mt. Barker says: Arthur Wilson, male, born 17 Jun 1856, father - Allen Wilson, Gentleman of Westbrook mother Ellen McLeod nee Reeves. Registered 13 Jul 1856. "Gentleman" he remained all his life.

DEATH OF CAPTAIN WILLIAM ALLEN

Uncle William was planning another trip back to England. He had been the previous year and renewed acquaintance with the many relatives in Kent which was to be to their advantage now. He may have been planning to retire permanently there as also in 1855 he had sold all his interests in "Buckland Park" to his friend and partner Capt. John Ellis. William had become a very rich man and was the largest colonial stockholder in the rich Burra Mines as well as being a land owner. He had been very generous to the Anglican Church and donated 7,000 pounds to help found St. Peter's College and paid 600 pounds for the block of land on which to build Pulteney Grammar School in 1849. Donations to other churches of different denominations followed.

William was living in a house on East Terrace, leased from H. Dutton. It adjoined the grounds of the newly built and splendid Ayres House that faced ‎(and still does)‎ North Terrace where lived his friend, lawyer, and managing executor of his estate. This was Henry ‎(later Sir Henry)‎ Ayres Premier of South Australia and after whom Ayres Rock ‎(Uluru)‎ was named. William had a housekeeper, Mary Moore and one maid servant. He died suddenly at his residence on the evening of 16 Oct 1856. He was aged 68 years,

Henry Ayres left a book of carbon copies on thinnest tissue paper of all the business he transacted on behalf of William Allen's estate until it was completed in 1861. Much is indecipherable, but a resume is included in the Allen section. The will was probated at 75.000 pounds nearer to $7 million in present day value. There were further sums invested in England. Not even a token amount of this wealth went to Allen Wilson, whose name appeared a few times in the Ayres book,

Oct. 17th - Despatched a messenger to Mr. Allen Wilson residing at Mt. Barker and he arrived at the deceased's late residence and found all in order and remained in conversation with Mr. Allen Wilson for an hour and a half.

Oct. 20th - The funeral was at the North Road Cemetery and next day in the S.A. "Register" there was a long account of it - "a large number of clergy followed ‎(the hearse)‎ and the succeeding carriage bore Mr. Allen Wilson, the only relative present." H. Ayres wrote on the 20th. -Returned from interment at 6 o'clock and I read over the Will in the presence of the Executors Messrs. Gwynne and Hawkes. the Bishop of Adelaide, Allen Wilson, John Ellis ‎(and several other whom he named.)‎ Oct. 21st - Mr. Allen Wilson called on Henry Ayres and expressed a wish that something should be done for Mrs. Moore who had been exceedingly faithful to his "cousin", H. Ayres asked Allen Wilson if he would accept the deceased's wearing apparel. He replied that he would.

Oct. 22nd - Mr. Allen Wilson left the cottage at 7 a.m. and H. Ayres inspected the cellar and took possession of 30 dozen port wine and a quantity of other wines.

Allen wrote to H. Ayres on Nov, 2nd and again on the 24th ‎(1856)‎. Unfortunately Henry Ayres book, half diary, half letter book did not include any copies of incoming mail so the subject of Allen's correspondence is not known. According to Marion, Allen's daughter, a codicil to Uncle William's Will in which, apparently softening toward his errant nephew, he had made provision for him, but it had not been signed or witnessed and was useless. Perhaps these letters concerned the codicil, and Allen, ever hopeful was asking if anything could be done. It was resolved by the three Executors that H. Ayres should write to Allen informing him that his request of the 24th ultima could not be complied with but that 500 pounds be paid immediately to each of themselves.

25 Jun 1860 - Thomas Baker Bass, the cousin and largest beneficiary of Dover Kent, had written in the previous March to H. Ayres concerning Allen Wilson. Henry had replied that Allen Wilson's account had been discharged under the marriage settlement conditions. Capt. Allen had held a mortgage on the Westbrook properties but at his death this mortgage had become null and void and became the sole property of Ellen Wilson and that was the last mention of the Wilson name. At least they had 2 houses and 3 land sections, freehold, not to mention uncle's raiment, even if badly needed cash was not forthcoming.

‎(The above information in the H. Ayres papers was found at the Public Records Office, Adelaide by E.M.S.)‎

It was one of Allen Wilson's peculiarities that he would not have a vehicle such as a gig or buggy for the use of his wife and daughters. If they wished to go anywhere they must walk. There were farm wagons, horses and his own riding horse and there must have been more than one pony for the sons to ride to Hahndorf College when that opened in 1857. Allen's horse had to be groomed by his sons as soon as they were old enough to do so. He treated them as so many lackeys. His horse, perfectly groomed, must be brought to the front steps for him to mount. He would emerge at the named time, very much the English squire in his attire and ride away.

Horace and William once took revenge by grooming only the side of the horse which faced the steps, the other side was left matted and unkempt from its paddock grazing. Their father was unaware of anything amiss until he reached the town where sniggers and finger pointing alerted him to take a look when he dismounted. They took the inevitable chastisement without fuss - a counter stroke had been achieved. Allen did not get the message. His boots must be polished to perfection, his coat brushed. Sons were valets and grooms and farm workers. He did see that they had a reasonable education however.

Another time the boys made a small hole in a cask that Allen took into Mt. Barker to have filled with yeast for bread-making. Naturally it leaked all the way home and spoilt one of his boots and burned hair from the horse. Other tales of the tricks they played are lost in time as E.M.S., though she was with Marion, her granny, quite a lot as a teenager, did not then appreciate "those old things". and now wishes very much that she had paid closer attention.

Late in his life mortgaged the coming season's crops for 200 pounds without informing his sons or Ellen and departed to Sydney for a holiday. Naturally enough those living at New Westbrook were incensed at his action and on his return he found that Ellen had turned him out. Allen Frederick, the eldest son, of Yorketown, Yorke Peninsula agreed to take him in. Allen F.'s two children Mabel and Lancelot, remembered him only as a kind and gentle grandfather whose main interest was flower growing, if someone would first dig the ground for him. He had brought with him papers and records of his English forebears. These he offered to Allen F. who refused in the late Victoria phrase equivalent with "he couldn't care less" so Allen tossed them on the fire. So, without such clues E.M.S. has been unable to trace the Wilson family in earlier generations, or progress much further than Osmond Wilson and even his first Christopher of the East India Company's Navy is doubtful.

Towards the end of 1889 Allen's health failed and he was taken to a nursing home at East Terrace, Adelaide. He left a few of his belongings behind. A tiger claw mounted in gold ‎(ex-Uncle William Allen)‎ and a pair of black onyx Italian intaglio cuff links ‎(or perhaps shirt studs, it is hard to tell)‎ with classical heads incised and a silver tortoise which opens to show minute ivory dice. Such were worn by gentlemen as fobs and were useful to while away the time when travelling. E.M.S. has them now. Other belongings included the miniature on ivory of Allen's father Christopher and his gold fob with the family crest as a seal. These were given to son Oscar who with his wife Louise most frequently visited him from their home at East Adelaide, The items now belong to Margaret Vasey of Kew, Victoria, Oscar's grand-daughter.

ALLEN DIED at this nursing home on January 6th 1890, in his 70th year and was buried at West Terrace Cemetery. The death notice stated "A Colonist of 51 years". His death certificate gives the cause as "paralysis, chronic rheumatism and valvular disease of the heart". Marion said that the paralysis ‎(a stroke)‎ was the final cause.

Biographical Notes Ellen McLeod REEVES -


Source: Mountain on the Plain
Publication: District Council of Mount Barker, ISBN: 0959120602, 1983


Hide Details Note: MT. BARKER AS THE WILSONS KNEW IT in the early days. Bob Schmidt's book "Mountain upon the Plain" published 1983 describes it well. The early settler, no matter how well educated, was described as wearing "the bush-man's garb of blue shirt, soiled cabbage tree hat with a broad black ribbon, booted and spurred and with the indispensable stock whip in hand and smoking a short black pipe". That "Gentleman" Wilson ever appeared thus is hard to believe and going by the accounts of his children he never did.

The land was beautiful and fertile "with deep black loam with a rich sward of grass and timber spaced as in an English park". The original sheep grazing, due to scab. was soon abandoned for the growing of wheat which was to give rich harvests for many years. Soon the pisé huts and small dwellings gave way to good buildings of the local freestone and limestone and later of the excellent bricks still made at Littlehampton nearby. The earliest inhabitants reached Mt. Barker via Glen Osmond, Crafers, Hahndorf and Littlehampton and took several days either by bullock waggon or carrying their belongings as horses were still scarce. ‎(A half hour by the south eastern freeway by car is now the norm.)‎ The wagons had to negotiate very steep inclines with timber drags as brakes to the vehicles.

By 1845 or 1847 when it is presumed the Wilsons made their way up through what was then called The Tiers there was a road of sorts to Mt. Barker and the toll gate at Mt. Osmond had abolished its system of fees. That building is still in place. Perhaps Ellen and the children escaped the rough wagon as a regular mail service had been inaugurated by Rounsvell who also carried passengers. Cobb & Co. followed, then Hill & Co. did the same, in sequence.

By 1851 Mt. Barker was the centre of a wheat boom and this could be the reason for Allen Wilson's recovery from bankruptcy and the ability to purchase the 4th section of 80 acres in January 1859. Many farms became almost self sufficient as did the Wilsons', eventually. Food prices were stable for a long time. Beef and mutton were one shilling per pound salt beef and pork 9 pence kangaroo the same and wild ducks were 1 shilling each. Quail were 6 pence. Fresh butter cost 2 shillings and 6 pence and salt butter 9 pence. Milk was 10 pence a quart, flour 55 shillings for a barrel of 196 pounds. Sugar was 6 pence a pound and tea 3 shillings and 6 pence.

The Church of England, St. James, built of stone, at Blakiston, and it the old Gothic style, was opened in 1847. Ellen was to be buried in its churchyard more than 50 years later and the two year old Maria who died in 1849 must have been one of the earliest interments. Until 1860 when an Anglican Church was built at Mt. Barker the people rode or walked out to St. James a mile and a half from the town, on Sundays to its small village setting. The Rev. Pollitt conducted a school there but there is no record of any of the Wilson children attending. The year 1852 saw the exit overland ‎(it took 3 weeks)‎ of a large proportion of the male population of South Australia, infected with gold fever and thousands passed through Mt. Barker to the ferry several miles ahead at Wellington, to cross the Murray River and all eager to reach the Victorian gold fields. But not Allen Wilson. There was also a gold rush at Echunga not far from Westbrook Farm.

The peaceful tribe of the Peramangk aborigines which never troubled the district, was dying out from diseases introduced by the white settlers and from the loss of hereditary land. In 1850 there had been 150 houses and 250 people; in 1860 the inhabitants numbered 1000 and had the comfort of a "proper" Post Office and Telegraph: Letters and parcels were handed out from a house window. There was a Police Station, a Public Pound, Court House, drapers, blacksmiths and grocery store. Originally supplies had to be purchased at inflated prices from Mrs. Gloag at her husband's inn, until John Dunn opened a shop next to his steam flour mill and charged reasonably.

The Adelaide "Register" pictured the townsfolk as: the women wearing long dresses with bustles, paniers or crinolines. The men in bowler hats, moleskin trousers with boyangs and swallowtail coats. The boyangs seem most unlikely for A. Wilson, gentleman, as the Directory recorded him. Old birthday books name some of the Wilson friends. The Walter Paterson family. They had a governess, Miss Congreve, and later a tutor, Henry Bonnar. As this family remained close friends into the next generation there is a strong possibility that the Wilsons shared these teachers. Ellen would never have had time to give lessons and Allen would have lacked the inclination.

Other names were the John Dunns of flour mill fame, the Greenfields, the Thomas family, Paltridge, Gower, Hedges of Wistow. and Krichauffs and Gemmells of Bugle Ranges. Duncan McFarlane was the earliest and the principle town resident at "Auchendarroch" and Lachlan McFarlane kept the "Oakfield" Hotel and had a farm of the same name. Other hotels were Gray's Inn and the "Crown". The "Oakfield" at the end of Gawler Street was the halting place of the Royal Mail ‎(which also took passengers)‎. The driver, William Moyse, in light fawn livery, top coat with large buttons and a light bell topper, drove 5 horses with great style. His guard in scarlet coat and braided cap occupied a special seat on the top left hand corner at the back and announced their approach with the "yard of tin", a bugle as long as his arm.

Victor Dumas who was a famed Latin teacher, opened a school in his two storey house in Walker Street in 1855 and Marion said that some of "the boys" attended there for varying periods. All of them, with the exception of Will did attend Hahndorf College even if just "to finish". This was the landscape wherein the Wilsons moved.

The Manning house at Westbrook Farm was large enough to have a guest room ‎(some of the sons slept in the two attic rooms)‎. In 1865 when Marion was aged 11 there was a momentous occasion when the Reeves grandparents from Kangaroo Island came to stay. Samuel had brought Charlotte to the mainland for medical attention ‎(she did not go back to Kingscote and died in March 1866)‎ and came for a last visit to Mt. Barker. Marion was sent out to the paddock where her older brothers were working to bid them to the house. So rare was this event she was not believed until one of them discovered that she was wearing her best shoes instead of the every day heavy boots. They were convinced. Charlotte wore a beaded gown of rich brown silk so stiff and boned over its crinoline that when she took it off it stood without support on the floor. This so intrigued the children that all but the babies crept in to view so memorable sight, ‎(Described in the Charlotte segment of the Reeves history)‎

It was during this visit that the grandparents discovered to their horror that Marion could neither read nor write. From an early age she had been needed as both nursery and house maid and the luxury of lessons was not for her. They extracted a promise from Allen and Ellen that Marion should be sent to school "forthwith" and so she was. to the Misses Dumas, at Mt. Barker, walking each way of course. These ladies, sisters of Victor Dumas' school for boys. Marion was there less than two years, as when sister Nell married in February 1867 she was urgently needed again at home.

As will be seen in the section for Nell. she was married, by the arrangement of Allen and Oscar Lines, to his son John Oscar, a farmer of Dublin, north of Adelaide. The ceremony was held at St. James Blakiston with the incumbent officiating. With Nell crone Marion was once more a household drudge. They did have maid servants when finances permitted, particularly after the influx of Irish girls whose depot for dispersal to households was Mt. Barker. At this time there were five older brothers at home, four younger and two baby girls. Marion found, that with her mother "every-thing was for the boys, a girl didn't matter". To the older sons Allen was "The Old Man" though he was still in his forties. In old age, if Marion was asked about her father all she would say, and that scornfully and with a sniff. was "HIM"! He could not have shown much affection, if any, to his numerous offspring, 13 of whom grew to adulthood.

On August 31st 1867 the eldest Wilson son, now 22 ‎(Allen Frederick)‎ rented the Old Westbrook land ‎(Section 3729)‎ and also 3002 nearer West-brook Farm, to start farming for himself. It was arranged that he would pay rental of 50 pounds per annum as "an annuity for Ellen McLeod Wilson" as recorded at Lands Titles. His brothers remained to farm at home which was beginning to prosper. It was in this same year, on November 11th that the countryside was electrified by the Royal Visit of the Duke of Edinburgh, a son of Queen Victoria. This prince drove the coach himself from Echunga and must have passed by Westbrook Farm on his way to Mt. Barker where Mr. Gray of the Savings Bank entertained him. On leaving for Strathalbyn many riders ‎(no doubt Allen Wilson included)‎ of whom a number were lady equestrians, accompanied the royal personage as escort. All were soon thickly covered with dust. Allen Frederick did not stay long at Old Westbrook. He took up land between Callington and Monarto and was joined there by brothers Edward and Ernest which left Horace & Will to farm on behalf of their parents. Marion was sent to housekeep from time to time until Allen F. married in 1872.

1867 to the 1880s.

The people of Mt. Barker were finding wheat less and less profitable and turned to dairying, though potatoes, maize, barley and hay crops continued. The soil no longer yielded rich wheat harvests. In 1869 came the waste lands act and, if 20 percent of the land value was paid, the balance could wait for four years, so many left for Yorke Peninsula and paid one pound per acre for untouched land. In 1870 V. Crase took a lease of Old Westbrook for four years.

Whereas the older sons had only finished their education at T.W. Boehm's Hahndorf Academy Allen and Ellen were able to send their younger sons Arthur, Oscar, Samuel and Osmond there for most of their education and the two youngest daughters to "finish" at Hardwicke College, St Peters. In spite of the many departures, the town of Mt. Barker, continued to improve. Cleggetts and Patersons stayed and bought up the old farms. In 1880 the town barber was said to be partial to onions, bad tobacco and worse whisky so that scented hair oil was quite unnecessary as the odour breathed on the customer lasted a full week. The opposition, named Ashley, was so shaky that he would hand the razor to his customer to shave himself - so wrote Bob Schmidt in his book. Allen Wilson survived these hazards.

THE LAST YEARS

About this time Ellen and Allen built a new house on Section 3002 already mentioned several times. This was nearer Mt. Barker than Westbrook Farm on the opposite side of the road. The one photograph E.M.S. has shows it to have been ‎(it still is occupied)‎ of stone, with a bull-nose front verandah similar to Old Westbrook. The actual date cannot be ascertained as Lands Titles deals only with land, and not the buildings erected on it. However, the Wilson daughters Maude and Ada in the picture were wearing dresses with bustles. These were fashionable in the late 1870's and mid 1880's. This they called "New Westbrook", and it was the house familiar to the Wilson grandchildren.

Ellen had, perforce, learned quickly how to cope with a house and many children, but up to this point of recording their story, all has been adverse concerning Allen. His one saving grace appears to have been his keen interest in gardening. Not just the necessary vegetables, but flowers and trees of many kinds that came to flourish at New Westbrook. A description of how this appeared in the 1890's will appear presently.

There is no doubt that both were generously hospitable. When their daughter Edith Maude was in hospital shortly before she died in 1947 she looked about the ward with about 20 other women and said, "We always have a lot of people to stay, but this is ridiculous". An amused nurse passed this comment on to the writer's mother.

The younger sons avoided farming. The Directory for 1872 shows Arthur age only 16, as Manager of Dunn's Mill at Wolseley in the south-east of the state and Oscar aged 15 as a Warehouseman boarding at Evandale, East Adelaide. Later as others of the family moved to the city, they rented house at Edward Street, Norwood, and Marion was their housekeeper, but by 1883 Oscar and Osmond had married, Samuel did not appear at this address after 1883, Maude and Ada who had used the house when not at their board-ing school had gone their way and Marion returned home until required as housekeeper for brother Ernest at Carrieton in the north of the state.

Only Will was farming Westbrook but Sam, who already had the tuberculosis from which he died in 1887 aged 28, apparently aided him after leaving the city position, so long as he could. In May 1889 the wife or Edward, the 3rd son, died, and he returned to "New Westbrook" with his young children so that in her latter years Ellen once more looked after small people. Some of these were already sick with the tuberculosis from which their mother died and Ellen probably was infected by them as she was to die of the same disease.

It was at this time that Allen made his final gaffe. He mortgaged the coming seasons crops for 200 pounds without informing his sons or Ellen and departed to Sydney for a holiday. Naturally enough those living at New Westbrook were incensed at his action and on his return he found that Ellen had turned him out. Allen Frederick, the eldest son, of Yorketown, Yorke Peninsula agreed to take him in. Allen F.'s two children Mabel and Lancelot, remembered him only as a kind and gentle grandfather whose main interest was flower growing, if someone would first dig the ground for him. He had brought with him papers and records of his English forebears. These he offered to Allen F. who refused in the late Victoria phrase equivalent with "he couldn't care less" so Allen tossed them on the fire. So, without such clues E.M.S. has been unable to trace the Wilson family in earlier generations, or progress much further than Osmond Wilson and even his first Christopher of the East India Company's Navy is doubtful.

Towards the end of 1889 Allen's health failed and he was taken to a nursing home at East Terrace, Adelaide. He left a few of his belongings behind. A tiger claw mounted in gold ‎(ex-Uncle William Allen)‎ and a pair of black onyx Italian intaglio cuff links ‎(or perhaps shirt studs, it is hard to tell)‎ with classical heads incised and a silver tortoise which opens to show minute ivory dice. Such were worn by gentlemen as fobs and were useful to while away the time when travelling. E.M.S. has them now. Other belongings included the miniature on ivory of Allen's father Christopher and his gold fob with the family crest as a seal. These were given to son Oscar who with his wife Louise most frequently visited him from their home at East Adelaide, The items now belong to Margaret Vasey of Kew, Victoria, Oscar's grand-daughter.

ALLEN DIED at this nursing home on January 6th 1890, in his 70th year and was buried at West Terrace Cemetery. The death notice stated "A Colonist of 51 years". His death certificate gives the cause as "paralysis, chronic rheumatism and valvular disease of the heart". Marion said that the paralysis ‎(a stroke)‎ was the final cause.

Ellen lived on for eleven years. She looked after the three surviving children of Edward ‎(the Pugh aunts cared for the three who died - in their last days)‎, she mended the rift that had arisen between her and Marion who had married Charles Percy Lakeman in 1887, and had their four daughters to stay quite often. She sent great hampers of farm produce down to town by train to the Lakemans. The railway had reached Mt. Barker in 1883 so that transport to the city was now both quicker and easier.

Between them, Marion, her children and her sister Maude, gave an account of New Westbrook as they remembered it in the 1890's. It was recalled with real affection as a place both lovely and happy where fruit and flowers and the good things that the farm provided were all so much superior to those seen any where else. Crops, sheep and pigs and a dairy herd provided income as well as bark from wattle trees to the Mt. Barker tannery, wool, dairy products, dripping, eggs, honey and honey comb and beeswax. Indian hawkers travelled the country-side bringing items of cloth and haberdashery. They had their own meat, butter, cream, cheese, vegetables and fruit, jams and preserves, poultry, hams and bacon. Their wheat was ground into flour at Dunn's Mill. "New Westbrook" was very nearly self sufficient.

Allen's gardening left a legacy, thus - a hedge of English hawthorn bordered the road boundary, and dividing the outer paddocks from the house garden was a long hedge of intertwined roses, a small variety of pink and crimson, richly perfumed. A willow fringed creek ran through the property and even in summer it did not lack a small flow of water, so that seepage pools could be made for garden watering. Deep wells provided water for the house and in later years underground tanks were installed.

The garden was as near an English one as he could contrive, and the Australian climate permitted. Allen had planted Firethorn ‎(crataegus)‎, cedars and other English trees to mingle with the native acacias. There was an orchard of apples of many varieties, pears, plums and medlars, apricots, peaches, figs and cherry trees both black and red. Strawberries, red and black currants, gooseberries, raspberries and blackberries along the creek and every type of vegetable. In the flower garden, his particular joy, there was a wealth of English flowers. Fox-gloves ‎(sold to chemists for their digitalis)‎, violets, campernels, daffodils, ixias, snowdrops, crocus, anemone, narcissus, and the old type roses everywhere. A honeysuckle archway curved over the beehives. Viburnum trees and English lilacs, larkspur, bluebell, lavender, wall-flowers, night scented stocks, clove pinks, sweet william, verbena, dahlia, chrysanthemums and dozens of others.

In 1896 when son Edward returned home to "New Westbrook" with his children, unfortunately, Will, who had run both Westbrook Farm and New Westbrook for so many years, did not agree so Will departed and Edward stayed on until 1902, a year after Ellen died and the property was sold.

ELLEN DIED at the age of 74, of tuberculosis ‎(her original death certificate is at Torrens Titles)‎ on 21 Apr 1901 and she was buried at the Blakiston Cemetery of St. James' Church. Son Will paid 80 pounds for a headstone, but typical of Will, he did not follow this up and the monumental mason having accepted the cash did not bother to erect the stone so no record remains there, just two bare earth mounds side by side, path VI in the St. James Register:

HER OBITUARY - from the Adelaide "Observer" of April 1901:-
"Mrs. Ellen Wilson, relict of the late Mr. Allen Wilson of Westbrook, Mt. Barker who died on Sunday at the age of 75 ‎(not until the Sept. of 1901)‎ was, says the Mt. Barker "Courier", a very early colonist having arrived in South Australia from Tasmania in the "Yatala" ‎(error- the "Minerva")‎ commanded by her brother-in-law Capt. Buckland in 1838 ‎(error she arrived on Nov. 3rd 1839, the Capt. was Robt. Pritchard)‎. The deceased lady was a daughter of Mr. Samuel Reeves, one of the first. Tasmanian settlers who occupied the position of Government explorer for many years and was also the representative of an English cattle company. After marriage with Mr. Wilson the couple first settled at Gawler River, afterwards removing to Westbrook. Mt. Barker. There was a family of 15 children, 11 of whom survive:- Mrs. J.O. Lines; Mr. A.F. Wilson, Mallala; Mr. E.M. Wilson of Jamestown; Mr. Edward P. Wilson of Westbrook; Mr. W.A. Wilson, Mt. Barker; Mrs. C.P. Lakeman, Grange; Mr. Arthur Wilson, Adelaide; Mr. O.S. Wilson of Messrs. Brice, Wilson & Co. Adelaide; Mr. O.H. Wilson of the National Bank, Melbourne; Miss E.M. Wilson and Mrs. H.P. Knight of Wolseley".

It was after Ellen's death and the settling of her estate ‎(she left it in equal shares to her surviving children)‎ that the question of her legal ownership arose. However, a statutory declaration, application No 24405, finally solved this problem.

Ellen gave each of her Lakeman grandchildren a little cup and saucer when each was about 6 years old. To Eunice a fluted, white, heavy china cup with a lot of gold and the words "Forget Me Not", and made in Germany on the base. Handle and saucer are missing; given in 1893. When Eunice and china got together there was often disaster. Edith's does not seem to have survived, but Olive's with an all-over pattern of blue on white of very thin china, and Violet's also thin and of white china, has delicate pattern in greys and blues and fluted edges. Both these are "as new" and E.M.S. has all three.

Edward continued at New Westbrook until the estate was sold in 1902. At Old Westbrook the original bread oven in the detached kitchen was only removed in 1980. Arthur Edward Braendler purchased first. The next owner was Johan Gottlieb Liebelt ‎(1853-1938)‎ of Friedrickstadt who passed at least Old Westbrook to his son Carl Louis Liebelt in 1926. ‎(The father purchased in 1909)‎. In 1982 Carl's son Louis E. Liebelt was at Old Westbrook but the family moved to Victoria in 1989. The present owner ‎(1991)‎ has not been traced. New Westbrook is also occupied by some of the Liebelt family, and Westbrook Farm held together for many years in spite of termites was eventually replaced by a brick house:

A final note on Ellen's belongings, E.M.S. has two of the plates of her tea set, white china patterned with sprays of lilac, all that is left of the set.

Death 6 January 1890 ‎(Age 69)‎ South Australia, Australia

Last Change 21 March 2010 - 14:23:36
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Parents Family  (F1908)
Christopher WILSON
1775 - 1836
Mary ALLEN
1790 - 1829
Elizabeth WILSON
1818 - 1835
Allen WILSON
1820 - 1890
Christopher WILSON
1822 - 1823

Immediate Family  (F1903)
Ellen McLeod REEVES
1826 - 1901
Ellen Allen Nell WILSON
1843 - 1933
Allen Frederick WILSON
1845 - 1933
Maria Louisa WILSON
1846 - 1849
Ernest McLeod WILSON
1847 - 1914
Edward Percival WILSON
1849 - 1911
Horace WILSON
1850 - 1886
William Allen Will WILSON
1852 - 1945
Marion WILSON
1854 - 1942
Arthur WILSON
1856 - 1926
Oscar Stirling WILSON
1857 - 1909
Christopher Samuel Sam WILSON
1859 - 1887
Reginald WILSON
1860 - 1860
Osmond Henry WILSON
1861 - 1945
Edith Maude WILSON
1863 - 1947
Ada Mary WILSON
1865 - 1947


Notes
Biographical Notes For Allen's Mother to have been buried at St. James, Piccadilly, London indicates that the Wilsons resided in that parish. At which school Allen received his early education is not now known, but his son Osmond having just a few remembrances of his father's remarks contacted King's School, Canterbury in 1920 as did E.M.S. in 1987 for confirmation and hoping for more detail of Allen's attendance. It was not forthcoming that is, to detail. Kings' School is said to be the oldest in England, being founded at Canterbury in 600 A.D. Osmond obtained a photograph, an embroidered blazer pocket with the school emblem, and a letter from the headmaster.

From: A. Latter, Head Master,
King's School, Canterbury.
reply dated 25 Apr 1920
To: Mr. Osmond Wilson.
Dear Sir, I have looked up Allen Wilson in our records which show as follows: Allen Wilson, son of Christopher Wilson, Purser, retired, R.N. Entered school Oct. 11, 1831, aged 11 years. Born at Lydd, Kent on April 6, 1820. Admitted to King's Scholarship Xmas 1832. Left school midsummer 1835 aged 15 years.
Yrs. truly Algernon Latter.

There is a school magazine with some of the school's history with the memorabilia collected by Osmond Wilson and now held by E.M.S. With the death of his father, Allen came under the guardianship of his mother's eldest brother, Captain William Allen ‎(1790 - 1856)‎ whose interesting life story is part of the Allen history. The captain retired from the East India Company's Navy in 1836. By the following year Allen was "walking the boards" at Guy's Hospital as a start to his proposed career as a doctor, even though he was only 17. That was the custom, with medical school and examinations in the years ahead. The primitive wards for poverty stricken patients, no antiseptics, no trained nurses, no anaesthetics or even reasonable cleanliness must have been an unpleasant shock to a boy brought up in comfortable circumstances.

Uncle William had returned from his adventurous life at sea a wealthy man and had no interest in the farm at Lydd. This he sold as both his parents had died, though one story is that he gave it to the farm manager as a gift, in any case, he parted with the Lydd property, set up his youngest brother Charles in business at Bristol, and after consulting with his special friend Captain John Ellis newly retired from the Royal Navy, looked about for something to interest them both. Captain Ellis' wife had recently died and although their 8 children had to be safely settled he felt free to join in any enterprise suggested by Capt. Allen. Opportunity beckoned from the other end of the world at the newly founded colony of South Australia and in 1838 the two captains decided to investigate prospects there.

That they sent the 17 year old Allen Wilson ahead to spy out the conditions seems an odd thing. Perhaps they merely wanted to get him out of the way. According to Osmond Wilson his father "left Guy's Hospital without completing his degree" and considering Allen's youth this was not surprising. Also, said Osmond, Allen joined a party which was about to embark on the "Duke of Roxburgh" which left St. Katherine's Docks, London on March 31st. The ship was of 416 tons and the commander was Captain Thomson. Allen's children said that he travelled in the care of some relatives.

The largest party aboard was that of Thomas Wilson, a lawyer of London, who was descended from Oliver Cromwell through his mother. His father George Wilson was a doctor as were several others in the family tree. However descendants of the present day deny any connection with Allen Wilson, it therefore seems only coincidence concerning the two surnames. In "Bridge over the Ocean" by S.C. Wilson and Keith Borrow, published in 1973 there is some account of the voyage by 20 year old Charles, son of Thomas, but no mention of Allen. The Thomas Wilsons joined the ship 3 days later at Gravesend ‎(on April 3)‎. The ship was some two miles off shore so they had to be rowed out to her, then climb up a rope ladder on the side of the vessel. Mrs. Wilson was hoisted up in a bosun's chair with daughter Agnes in her lap. Of the 8 children of Thomas and Martha only 5 accompanied them. Charles wrote that the chair was of a particular construction and wrapped around with the British colours. They also had some servants. Next day they sailed "with a fair wind about quarter to six". Allen was on his way to South Australia.

Charles went on to say that there were 3 dozen sheep on board for food on the voyage beside those belonging to passengers in the Cabin ‎(the first class)‎, two goats ‎(and a kid)‎ for milk for their tea but no cow. There were 4 dogs, "our greyhound which is the best dog on board", a large bull mastiff, a small white bitch and a Scotch terrier. Then on each side of the poop, all the way along were coops of fowls, about a hundred of them, the rest plus geese were on the larboard side as well as ducks and two dozen pigs. So Allen was in the midst of something of a Noah's Ark. Mr. de Horn played the flute as did Mr. Holthouse. Mr. Philcox and Mr. Edmonds played the horn, so that they often had duets, very pleasant and well played, with the passengers joining in singing choruses, the National Anthem, Rule Britannia etc. If Allen was as tone deaf as a number of his descendants it is to be hoped that he refrained from taking part. Charles was a naturalist by inclination and remarked fish, porpoises, nautilus shells in a flotilla, sailing by, but nothing else of his fellow travellers and his early enthusiasm for recording in his diary had petered out by the time the ship had reached the Canary Islands. A great storm was encountered in June as they rounded the Cape of Good Hope and Charles wrote a poem about it which in later years appeared in the "South Australian Magazine".

None of the new colonists had the least idea of the conditions that awaited them at the end of their voyage of four months which ended on July 28, 1838. Kangaroo Island had been passed and Mt. Lofty rising above the plain of the mainland had come into view. There was no pilot. to guide the vessel but the harbour having been discovered, the twisted way past the mangroves lining the river was accomplished to the Old Port. distinguished only by an iron store and two mud huts and swarms of mosquitoes and the novelty of black swans, pelicans, screaming cockatoos and other wild life was forgotten with the sudden discomforts facing the new arrivals. There was only one way to reach the shore, on the backs of wading sailors. Luggage was carried by servants or oneself through scrub covered sandhills and along the faintly discernable track which led to Adelaide about 8 miles to the east. There was no available transport and compasses were produced to ensure that no-one became lost in the scrub. So the company left Port Misery, Allen amongst them, and made its weary way to the town.

Arrival at Adelaide must have been a further shock. There were already 5000 inhabitants occupying the square mile which Colonel William Light had surveyed, and through it, scattered between the many trees, but facing whichever way the owner fancied, was a town of packing case villas with pork barrel chimneys, tents of calico or tarpaulin and huts of mud and reeds, with a very few prefabricated Manning houses brought from London ready to be erected. The first Governor, Capt. John Hindmarsh had just departed ‎(on July 16)‎ leaving the first Government House of rough timber, built by his Marines, minus a chimney at first, on the bank of the River Torrens, with the dwellings of other officials nearby. Here Thomas Wilson and his family lived at first, but soon removed to a Mannin house at North Adelaide, ADELAIDE, SOUTH AUSTRALIA.

Allen had his 18th birthday during the voyage. Where he lived during the months before his uncle and Capt. Ellis arrived can only be guessed at. There is a strong possibility that he went to a primitive inn among the gum trees of Franklin Street where the recently married young publican was Oscar John Lines from Harpenden, Hertfordshire. Oscar and Allen remained lifelong friends and between them arranged marriages between some of their children. How Allen filled his days is another mystery. Perhaps chasing the wallabies and kangaroos that still haunted the "city" streets.

In due course the two captains arrived on March 21, 1839, in what was then considered luxury, aboard the "Buckinghamshire" of 1468 tons, commanded by Capt. Thomson. Having agreed to become partners in whatever venture was decided upon, they had purchased their first land by the following October. This was 2000 acres at Port Gawler. The sale was registered on 25 Oct 1839. The previous owner was George Milner Stephen, a son-in-law of Governor Hindmarsh, and in his absence, Acting Governor. This land was known as the Milner Estate. Stephen was intent on making a fortune and speculating in land. He advertised in May 1839 that a 4 ton schooner rigged deck sailing vessel plied from Pt. Adelaide every Wednesday and Saturday by George Prince, to the Gawler River ‎(it was also referred to as the Para)‎, to visit the Milner Estate which was for sale This would have been the mode of conveyances for Allen Wilson, his uncle and Captain Ellis. Stephen had paid 400 pounds for 4000 acres. He charged the captains 10,000 pounds for their 2000 acres When they discovered that they should not have paid more than one pound per acre they were naturally infuriated.

Presently a court case ensued. Published accounts stated that the captains purchased two thirds of the Milner Estate. However it was their misfortune in thus being cheated and there was no reparation. The partners added considerably to their holding in this area until they owned in excess of 17,000 acres and 2 miles of water frontage ‎(of the river)‎. Allen took part in these early occurrences. There were to be eventually 6 houses on this land and the first, and no doubt a very simple one, was on an eminence overlooking the river. It was built of English bricks used as ballast in the two ships owned by Captain Ellis and used to bring out stock, household furnishing etc. Captain Ellis remarried Susannah, the eldest daughter of Governor Sir John Hindmarsh ‎(and had further family)‎.

The large house, finished by 1843 where Allen and Ellen lived was named "Buckland Park". Some printed accounts give that this derived from Captain Allen's English home. This is not so as he originated from Lydd He remained a bachelor.

It is believed in the Wilson family that Ellen's eldest sister, Charlotte, who married her cousin Captain Thomas Buckland, was responsible for the name. When Charlotte married at Holy Trinity in 1840 she gave her address as Para River and formerly of Playden, Sussex. She must therefore have been living at "Buckland Park", perhaps as house-keeper at the first house erected on the property. Had Charlotte been with her parents her address would have been Gumeracha, ‎(or Timnath)‎.

That the Reeves and Aliens were related in an earlier generation was another family story of the Wilsons. If so, E.M.S. was unable to trace it. With an as yet very thinly spread population and Samuel Reeves Flockmaster for the South Australian Company, even without any family tie, the two households would have soon met, being in the same general area north of Adelaide. So it was to the fine large "Buckland Park" that Allen took his very young bride in February 1843 and according to Osmond Wilson the first four of their fifteen children were born there, however as the Wilsons were at Mt. Barker by 1845 only the first two were. Ellen Allen ‎(known as Nell)‎ Wilson arrived the following November. For the curious, 9 months and 3 days after the wedding, and she was then 17. Her 15th was born when she was 39 in 1865. Her photograph of about this time shows her to be slender, small and very pretty still. Her matron's cap was a mere wisp and her dark, rather plain crinoline had three flounces on the lower skirt and a matching jacket fell in peaks at its hemline. Whit cuffs and the high neckline softened by a lace ruffle threaded through with ribbon completed the picture.

Her life of ease at "Buckland Park" was not to last. Due to the stupidity of her young husband a future fortune and all aid from Captain Allen was lost in a few moments one hot summer day. As the Temperance people would have said, the Demon Drink was responsible for the disaster which led to the ousting of the Wilsons and their forced removal to Mt. Barker. The exact date is uncertain. By Osmond Wilson's reckoning it was 1849, but Land Titles records their Mt. Barker occupation as 1845 to 1901. One paper is dated 1847.

So far as Allen knew, Uncle William was safely in Adelaide, and he took himself to one of the wayside grog shops, mere huts on the most frequently used tracks, for refreshment and stayed too long. He became garrulous and shouted to the company that if he could get his hands on the old man's money bags he'd put him in the Workhouse. Uncle had

made an early return and had just stepped in to slake his own thirst from the dust of the roads, and thus learned at first hand his heir's opinion and ingratitude. It was the end of any possible inheritance. Allen was cut off without so much as the proverbial shilling.

There was but one place for them to go, Mt. Barker. Captain Allen had given Ellen, in her own right, three sections in the Mt. Barker Special Survey, as a wedding gift. Perhaps even then he had suspicions of his nephew. It is said that he was very fond of Ellen, but a wife's place was with her husband so she must suffer along with him. The Wilson children maintained that their father arrived in Australia with £30,000 which was undoubtedly an exaggeration. Even £3,000 seems an excessive sum, as Allen's father, Christopher, left an estate valued at only £100 and that to his 2nd wife. Any inheritance would have come from his Allen grandfather, via the estate of his deceased mother, Mary.

AT MOUNT BARKER

Tracing the early history of this land presents a tangled skein. Each section described singly makes a clearer picture. The two sections were in the Three ‎(Davenport)‎ Brothers Special Survey in the Hundred of Macclesfield. Section 3729 at Western Flat near Mr. Barker which came to be called "Old Westbrook" was originally purchased by J.B. Hack who sold to E.O. Philcox in 1840. Not the horn player of the "Duke of Roxburgh" voyage, but a doctor who arrived by the "John" with his wife on 4 Feb 1840. Dr. Philcox did not take to farming and advertised "To Let":- in Adelaide "Registers" from Sept. 17th to Nov. 5th 1842 on page 1....

"89 acres of excellent land, 20 acres enclosed and cultivated. Stone House nearly complete, 2 workmen's cottages, dairy, milking and stock yards. An excellent run and abundance of water throughout the year"

This section with two others ‎(to be described presently)‎ had a total of 349 acres. With wedding plans being made and no doubt advice from his uncle on 26 Aug 1842 Allen Wilson gave Dr. Philcox a mortgage of £1070 7 shillings at 10 percent per annum. Bargain and sale for one year. But a month later the mortgage was transferred to Captain William Allen and the place leased out for 12 months. This, and the other sections, were the subject of a pre-wedding settlement upon Ellen McLeod Reeves by the Captain and it was signed and witnessed on their wedding day of 15 Feb 1845. The document was handed over to lawyer Frederic Bayne and his partner Henry Johnson for registration, as they were appointed Trustees, but they failed to register it and this led to difficulties when Ellen died in 1901, but these were sorted out. A copy of this Memorial Deed is at Land Titles ‎(the Old Torrens Titles building register)‎ and another was at one time in a pocket of the leather cover of Osmond Wilson's album of the Wilson family now in the possession of E.M.S. The first tenant was Richard Eales Borrow from 1843 to 1854. The rent received was originally for Ellen's pin money, but became the main income for a long time as Allen, described always in Directories as "Gentleman" was said never to have done a days manual labour in his life. ‎(The Memorial Deed is No. 105B)‎.

"Old Westbrook" is still occupied and the word Westbrook scratched on front window with a diamond is still there too. "Old Westbrook" was never lived in by Allen, Ellen and their family, and when they left "Buckland Park" for Mt. Barker they went to Section 3717 on which there was a Manning pre-fabricated house brought out from England and which was to be known as "Westbrook Farm". Like Section 3729 at Western Flat this one was also first owned by J.B. Hack ‎(who erected the house)‎ and then by Dr. Philcox. It was described as "80 acres with posts and 3 and 4 rail fences, the Manning house, 3 huts for workers, stone dairy, stockyards etc." Hack had called it "Burnwath", changed to "Woodside" by Philcox and finally "Westbrook Farm" by the Wilsons. This property was 4 miles from Mt. Barker on the Macclesfield Road, and exactly opposite to the turn off to Echunga. The Manning house must have been one of the larger ones as it had two attic rooms, where according to Marion Wilson ‎(my grandmother, Mrs. C.P. Lakeman eventually)‎ apples were stored and many cored and sliced and strung on cords to dry and be used later for pies when apples were out of season.

Manning houses were erected at Blackiston near Mt. Barker by Capt. Francis Davison as well as many in the city. He seems to have been an agent for the district with a carpenter to put them up at a charge of 10 shillings a day plus meals. The English advertisement for these early prefabs. was by H. Manning, 251 High Holorn, London.

"The house is packed into a small compass and may be erected with windows, doors, locks and painted inside and out, floors, etc. Complete for habitation in a few hours after landing. Prices £15 pounds and upwards. They may be taken to pieces and moved as often as convenience of the settler may require. Manufactured on the most simple and approved principles". They varied in size from a single room to quite large dwellings. The Friends ‎(Quakers)‎ Meeting House at North Adelaide is the only example that has survived. What Mr. Manning failed to consider was the prevalence of termites in S.A. By the time Marion had grown up the timber "Westbrook Farm" had been invaded by them.

To quote Great Aunt Maude Wilson, sister of Marion, she could have put it together with a hairpin and the help of a strong boy. Her brother Osmond, already mentioned, made a romanticized sketch of this house, with gables and attic rooms and surrounding verandahs and rose arches in the garden. With parents, so large a family and room for guests it must have been fairly commodious. As already stated the Wilsons took up residence there in 1845 by the Lands Titles record, in which case the third child, Maria Louisa was born there in 1846 and died in 1849, and 12 more also saw the light of day at "Westbrook Farm".

A 3rd section of 3730, next door to "Old Westbrook" at Mt. Barker, was purchased on 13 Jan 1859 and was nearer to "Westbrook Farm" than Mt. Barker and here at a later date the third house ‎(of stone)‎ was built and known as "New Westbrook". So it would seem the Wilson acreage was approximately 430, and insufficient one would think to make a reasonable living. Also, in view of Allen's bankruptcy of 1850 it is a mystery as to how he could afford to purchase another section.

The name "Westbrook" seems to have derived from the great house at Lydd in the Romney Marsh, named "Westbroke". The Allen family was recorded there from the 15th century, that is at Lydd. They were farmers and graziers and amongst the better known families. The only connection with "Westbroke" Manor that research has brought to light concerns the marriage of Baker Coates ‎(licence dated 22 May 1764)‎ of New Romney who was a brother of Allen Wilson's great grandmother Ann Allen ‎(nee Coates)‎. The bride was Elizabeth Dering, daughter of Edward ‎(later Sir Edward, baronet)‎ of Surrenden Manor, Pluckley and Westbroke Manor Lydd, the latter being a secondary property of the Dering family. The connection seems to be a very remote one for Allen Wilson to be so obsessed with the Westbrook name, even lacking the final "e" and adding an extra "o".

Another possibility is the answer to the supposed Reeves/Allen connection previously mentioned. A cousin of Capt. William Allen ‎(and therefore also of Allen Wilson's mother)‎ was Thomas Shoosmith of Lydd who married Ann Terry, daughter of Stephen Terry, at Lydd in 1799. Then in 1833 Ann's niece Louisa Terry married John Reeves at Lydd. John was uncle of Allen Wilson's wife nee Ellen McLeod Reeves, and only brother of her father Samuel.

BANKRUKPTCY

Allen Wilson of Port Gawler, late of Mt. Barker became the creditor of John Morphett on 9 Mar 1843 and his attorney was Samuel Smart. No details were found. However it would appear that Allen was of Mt. Barker. even if briefly, before he married. Perhaps "Old Westbrook" was fleetingly his home. This money trouble was less than a month after his marriage. By 1850 he was in real financial trouble. He was insolvent as gazetted 16 Feb 1850 and again on 7 Aug 1850.

Schedule 1. "I, Allen Wilson of Westbrook in the District of Mt. Barker gentleman, do hereby declare that I am insolvent and unable to meet my engagements. Dated this Seventh day of August, one thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty. Signed in the presence of Charles Fenn, a practioner in the Supreme Court". Schedule 2 was missing from the record. Schedule 3. "A statement of the real and personal of Mr. Allen Wilson, Insolvent, made and filed in pursuance of the ordinances of the Legislative Council of the Province, relating to Insolvent Debtors, passed on 10 Jul 1845 signed Woods."

"Statement: "The insolvent has contingent interest in certain lands at Mt. Barker, expectant on the death of his wife and children".‎(Note: the wife was aged 23 and the children infants or nearly so)‎.
Personal estate:
4 cows and calves residing at the residence of Allen Wilson of Westbrook,
2 pigs. Debts due 9 pounds 10 shillings from J.E. Phillips. Signed William Fenn, solicitor.
List of articles prayed to be re-assigned under the provision of the ordinance now in force in the said Province concerning insolvent debtors.
1 cedar table - value 10/-
1 dressing table - value 10/-
1 small table - value 5/-
6 chairs - value 1pd.10/-
1 washstand - value 10/-
1 bedstead - value 10/-
1 iron bedstead - value 10/-
1 dressing glass - value 10/-
1 chamber set value 5/-
1 doz knives & forks value 5/-
1 harness crock - value 5/-
1 small do - value 4/-
3 buckets - value 6/-
1 wash tub - value 2/6
2 decanters - value 10/-
1 dressing case -value 10/-
1 gun case value 5/-
cooking utensils - value 1pd.
bedding - value 1pd.
2 mattresses - value 15/-
garden tools - value 5/-
2 leather trunks - value 10/-
1 portmanteau - value 5/-
Total value of these items 10 pounds, 17 shillings, and 6 pence

There is no doubt that Allen admitted only to a small portion of their belongings. E.M.S. has one of the heavy cut glass decanters, 3 of the set of 12 dessert plates with fruit motifs not mentioned, one fluted silver dessert spoon, one sterling silver teaspoon, one of a pair of heavy brass candlesticks and a pair of pink china candlesticks also not listed.

Clothing of Mrs. Ellen M. Wilson - total value 10 pounds, 17 shillings and 6 pence
3 print dresses - value 7/6
1 shawl - value 5/-
2 flannel petticoats -value 5/-
8 children's frocks -12/-
2 calico do - value 3/-
8 shifts - value 8/-
3 shifts - value 4/6
8 petticoats - value 8/-
1 pr. stays - value 2/-
4 pr. stockings - value 3/-
4 pr. shoes - value 4/-
4 pr. socks - value 2/-
1 pr. shoes - value 2/-
1 portmanteau - value 5/-

Perhaps it was too delicate a matter to mention a lady's drawers or baby napkins or caps etc. No bonnet for Ellen either. One can imagine making his lists by candle light and forgetting the baby's cradle or sets of dishes, even spoons and the all important carving knife. As 3 of the children were boys "frocks" would seem inappropriate until it is remembered that in those days small boys wore dresses until they were about 6.

Clothing of Mr. Allen Wilson - total value 17 pounds 1 shilling ‎($34.10)‎
2 coats - value 1 pound
4 pr. socks - value 2/-
2 pr. trousers - value 10/-
2 pr. drawers - value 2/-
2 waist coats - value 7/-
2 pr. boots - value 5/-
3 shirts - value 7/6
1 hat - value 2/-
2 pocket handkerchiefs 2/-

August 27th 1850 - Allen Wilson retained William Fenn to represent him. Fenn accepted. Schedule 243 Insolvencies. Allen Wilson on his own petition he being at large ‎(i.e. he was not in gaol for debt.)‎

September 13th 1850 - Allen Wilson was judged insolvent before the Court, but he refused even under oath to reveal all his estate. On that date also it was decided that a meeting of his creditors be held on Oct. 13th. October 13th 1850 - Debts in total were found to be 180 pounds. He declared under oath ‎(and no doubt lied in his teeth)‎ that his furniture was as scheduled.

October 31st - Final examination of Allen Wilson before the Court. April 1st 1851 - Fiat of Insolvency sworn.

At this point Ellen came near to losing her small estate of "Old Westbrook" and its adjoining section, leased out, and "Westbrook Farm" where they resided. Her lawyer Trustees had pocketed their fee but never registered the gift from Capt. William Allen. Johnson had departed to Victoria. Frederick Bayne, her brother-in-law, had "Bolted" to Tasmania after embezzling his clients' monies. There was no-one to prove on her behalf that she was the legal owner. Dr. John Rankine of Strathalbyn, M.P. for Mt. Barker came to her rescue as did Edward Stirling also of Strathalbyn.

When Ellen went to Adelaide to defend her right of ownership, she was laughed at by the learned gentlemen and told that they did not do business with little girls. She drew herself up to her full less than 5 feet and said with dignity, "I will have you know that I am a respectable married woman of 23 years of age and the mother of four children living." And that put the said gentlemen back in their boxes and they were impressed enough to take her claim seriously.

It was found that the missing Johnson and Bayne had deposited deeds they did not own as security, and few of their land transactions had been registered, including Ellen's, This was to cause further trouble at her death in 1901. For the present her claim was upheld and prevented the property from being seized and sold to pay Allen's debts. When all was settled satisfactorily, and 5 years later, new Trustees were appointed 12 Dec 1856. Nothing was hurried in those days. F. Bayne of Melbourne ‎(having left Tasmania and started a law practice again)‎ and Henry Johnson of Geelong, Victoria, were replaced by Edward Stirling of Strathalbyn and Lauchlin McFarlane of the "Oakfield Hotel", Mt. Barker. Ellen Wilson of Mt. Barker ‎(memo 113, Folio 260)‎ had a safe haven for her children. They had increased to 9 births with 8 living. Marion, the eighth, and source of many family tales, was not registered at Mt. Barker as were the others, when she arrived in 1854. The sons, 10 in all, were all important.

Allen's debts of 1850/1851 were to Captain John Ellis to whom he owed 37 pounds 10 shillings. To Captain William Allen, owed since 1647 ‎(which seems to point to this being the year the Wilsons left "Buckland Park", 17 pounds 10 shillings, and to others he was in debt 176 pounds 7 shillings and 11 pence. At the time the estate debt due from F. Bayne was 100 pounds but never paid. The rent from "Old Westbrook" brought only 143 pounds for 5 years and was paid to Ellen. What had been intended as her pin money by Uncle William Aller was family income. R.E. Borrow completed his lease in 1854 and a Mr. Arm-field was her next tenant but sub-let to a Mr. Jarrett. On April 9th 1856 it was leased for 8 years to John Knight for 60 pounds ($120)‎ per annum ‎(folio 273)‎.

These were hard years for Ellen both financially and physically. She who had done no household tasks when she married at 16 was forced to even make shoes for the children. Tacks being unavailable she whittled small wooden pegs for the same purpose. The eldest daughter, Nell, was of an age to give some household help but there was no mention of servants in the family annals apart from the midwife from Mt. Barker who usually stayed a month. There were farm labourers because Allen had no will to work. The registration of the 9th child, at Mt. Barker says: Arthur Wilson, male, born 17 Jun 1856, father - Allen Wilson, Gentleman of Westbrook mother Ellen McLeod nee Reeves. Registered 13 Jul 1856. "Gentleman" he remained all his life.

DEATH OF CAPTAIN WILLIAM ALLEN

Uncle William was planning another trip back to England. He had been the previous year and renewed acquaintance with the many relatives in Kent which was to be to their advantage now. He may have been planning to retire permanently there as also in 1855 he had sold all his interests in "Buckland Park" to his friend and partner Capt. John Ellis. William had become a very rich man and was the largest colonial stockholder in the rich Burra Mines as well as being a land owner. He had been very generous to the Anglican Church and donated 7,000 pounds to help found St. Peter's College and paid 600 pounds for the block of land on which to build Pulteney Grammar School in 1849. Donations to other churches of different denominations followed.

William was living in a house on East Terrace, leased from H. Dutton. It adjoined the grounds of the newly built and splendid Ayres House that faced ‎(and still does)‎ North Terrace where lived his friend, lawyer, and managing executor of his estate. This was Henry ‎(later Sir Henry)‎ Ayres Premier of South Australia and after whom Ayres Rock ‎(Uluru)‎ was named. William had a housekeeper, Mary Moore and one maid servant. He died suddenly at his residence on the evening of 16 Oct 1856. He was aged 68 years,

Henry Ayres left a book of carbon copies on thinnest tissue paper of all the business he transacted on behalf of William Allen's estate until it was completed in 1861. Much is indecipherable, but a resume is included in the Allen section. The will was probated at 75.000 pounds nearer to $7 million in present day value. There were further sums invested in England. Not even a token amount of this wealth went to Allen Wilson, whose name appeared a few times in the Ayres book,

Oct. 17th - Despatched a messenger to Mr. Allen Wilson residing at Mt. Barker and he arrived at the deceased's late residence and found all in order and remained in conversation with Mr. Allen Wilson for an hour and a half.

Oct. 20th - The funeral was at the North Road Cemetery and next day in the S.A. "Register" there was a long account of it - "a large number of clergy followed ‎(the hearse)‎ and the succeeding carriage bore Mr. Allen Wilson, the only relative present." H. Ayres wrote on the 20th. -Returned from interment at 6 o'clock and I read over the Will in the presence of the Executors Messrs. Gwynne and Hawkes. the Bishop of Adelaide, Allen Wilson, John Ellis ‎(and several other whom he named.)‎ Oct. 21st - Mr. Allen Wilson called on Henry Ayres and expressed a wish that something should be done for Mrs. Moore who had been exceedingly faithful to his "cousin", H. Ayres asked Allen Wilson if he would accept the deceased's wearing apparel. He replied that he would.

Oct. 22nd - Mr. Allen Wilson left the cottage at 7 a.m. and H. Ayres inspected the cellar and took possession of 30 dozen port wine and a quantity of other wines.

Allen wrote to H. Ayres on Nov, 2nd and again on the 24th ‎(1856)‎. Unfortunately Henry Ayres book, half diary, half letter book did not include any copies of incoming mail so the subject of Allen's correspondence is not known. According to Marion, Allen's daughter, a codicil to Uncle William's Will in which, apparently softening toward his errant nephew, he had made provision for him, but it had not been signed or witnessed and was useless. Perhaps these letters concerned the codicil, and Allen, ever hopeful was asking if anything could be done. It was resolved by the three Executors that H. Ayres should write to Allen informing him that his request of the 24th ultima could not be complied with but that 500 pounds be paid immediately to each of themselves.

25 Jun 1860 - Thomas Baker Bass, the cousin and largest beneficiary of Dover Kent, had written in the previous March to H. Ayres concerning Allen Wilson. Henry had replied that Allen Wilson's account had been discharged under the marriage settlement conditions. Capt. Allen had held a mortgage on the Westbrook properties but at his death this mortgage had become null and void and became the sole property of Ellen Wilson and that was the last mention of the Wilson name. At least they had 2 houses and 3 land sections, freehold, not to mention uncle's raiment, even if badly needed cash was not forthcoming.

‎(The above information in the H. Ayres papers was found at the Public Records Office, Adelaide by E.M.S.)‎

It was one of Allen Wilson's peculiarities that he would not have a vehicle such as a gig or buggy for the use of his wife and daughters. If they wished to go anywhere they must walk. There were farm wagons, horses and his own riding horse and there must have been more than one pony for the sons to ride to Hahndorf College when that opened in 1857. Allen's horse had to be groomed by his sons as soon as they were old enough to do so. He treated them as so many lackeys. His horse, perfectly groomed, must be brought to the front steps for him to mount. He would emerge at the named time, very much the English squire in his attire and ride away.

Horace and William once took revenge by grooming only the side of the horse which faced the steps, the other side was left matted and unkempt from its paddock grazing. Their father was unaware of anything amiss until he reached the town where sniggers and finger pointing alerted him to take a look when he dismounted. They took the inevitable chastisement without fuss - a counter stroke had been achieved. Allen did not get the message. His boots must be polished to perfection, his coat brushed. Sons were valets and grooms and farm workers. He did see that they had a reasonable education however.

Another time the boys made a small hole in a cask that Allen took into Mt. Barker to have filled with yeast for bread-making. Naturally it leaked all the way home and spoilt one of his boots and burned hair from the horse. Other tales of the tricks they played are lost in time as E.M.S., though she was with Marion, her granny, quite a lot as a teenager, did not then appreciate "those old things". and now wishes very much that she had paid closer attention.

Late in his life mortgaged the coming season's crops for 200 pounds without informing his sons or Ellen and departed to Sydney for a holiday. Naturally enough those living at New Westbrook were incensed at his action and on his return he found that Ellen had turned him out. Allen Frederick, the eldest son, of Yorketown, Yorke Peninsula agreed to take him in. Allen F.'s two children Mabel and Lancelot, remembered him only as a kind and gentle grandfather whose main interest was flower growing, if someone would first dig the ground for him. He had brought with him papers and records of his English forebears. These he offered to Allen F. who refused in the late Victoria phrase equivalent with "he couldn't care less" so Allen tossed them on the fire. So, without such clues E.M.S. has been unable to trace the Wilson family in earlier generations, or progress much further than Osmond Wilson and even his first Christopher of the East India Company's Navy is doubtful.

Towards the end of 1889 Allen's health failed and he was taken to a nursing home at East Terrace, Adelaide. He left a few of his belongings behind. A tiger claw mounted in gold ‎(ex-Uncle William Allen)‎ and a pair of black onyx Italian intaglio cuff links ‎(or perhaps shirt studs, it is hard to tell)‎ with classical heads incised and a silver tortoise which opens to show minute ivory dice. Such were worn by gentlemen as fobs and were useful to while away the time when travelling. E.M.S. has them now. Other belongings included the miniature on ivory of Allen's father Christopher and his gold fob with the family crest as a seal. These were given to son Oscar who with his wife Louise most frequently visited him from their home at East Adelaide, The items now belong to Margaret Vasey of Kew, Victoria, Oscar's grand-daughter.

ALLEN DIED at this nursing home on January 6th 1890, in his 70th year and was buried at West Terrace Cemetery. The death notice stated "A Colonist of 51 years". His death certificate gives the cause as "paralysis, chronic rheumatism and valvular disease of the heart". Marion said that the paralysis ‎(a stroke)‎ was the final cause.
Biographical Notes MT. BARKER AS THE WILSONS KNEW IT in the early days. Bob Schmidt's book "Mountain upon the Plain" published 1983 describes it well. The early settler, no matter how well educated, was described as wearing "the bush-man's garb of blue shirt, soiled cabbage tree hat with a broad black ribbon, booted and spurred and with the indispensable stock whip in hand and smoking a short black pipe". That "Gentleman" Wilson ever appeared thus is hard to believe and going by the accounts of his children he never did.

The land was beautiful and fertile "with deep black loam with a rich sward of grass and timber spaced as in an English park". The original sheep grazing, due to scab. was soon abandoned for the growing of wheat which was to give rich harvests for many years. Soon the pisé huts and small dwellings gave way to good buildings of the local freestone and limestone and later of the excellent bricks still made at Littlehampton nearby. The earliest inhabitants reached Mt. Barker via Glen Osmond, Crafers, Hahndorf and Littlehampton and took several days either by bullock waggon or carrying their belongings as horses were still scarce. ‎(A half hour by the south eastern freeway by car is now the norm.)‎ The wagons had to negotiate very steep inclines with timber drags as brakes to the vehicles.

By 1845 or 1847 when it is presumed the Wilsons made their way up through what was then called The Tiers there was a road of sorts to Mt. Barker and the toll gate at Mt. Osmond had abolished its system of fees. That building is still in place. Perhaps Ellen and the children escaped the rough wagon as a regular mail service had been inaugurated by Rounsvell who also carried passengers. Cobb & Co. followed, then Hill & Co. did the same, in sequence.

By 1851 Mt. Barker was the centre of a wheat boom and this could be the reason for Allen Wilson's recovery from bankruptcy and the ability to purchase the 4th section of 80 acres in January 1859. Many farms became almost self sufficient as did the Wilsons', eventually. Food prices were stable for a long time. Beef and mutton were one shilling per pound salt beef and pork 9 pence kangaroo the same and wild ducks were 1 shilling each. Quail were 6 pence. Fresh butter cost 2 shillings and 6 pence and salt butter 9 pence. Milk was 10 pence a quart, flour 55 shillings for a barrel of 196 pounds. Sugar was 6 pence a pound and tea 3 shillings and 6 pence.

The Church of England, St. James, built of stone, at Blakiston, and it the old Gothic style, was opened in 1847. Ellen was to be buried in its churchyard more than 50 years later and the two year old Maria who died in 1849 must have been one of the earliest interments. Until 1860 when an Anglican Church was built at Mt. Barker the people rode or walked out to St. James a mile and a half from the town, on Sundays to its small village setting. The Rev. Pollitt conducted a school there but there is no record of any of the Wilson children attending. The year 1852 saw the exit overland ‎(it took 3 weeks)‎ of a large proportion of the male population of South Australia, infected with gold fever and thousands passed through Mt. Barker to the ferry several miles ahead at Wellington, to cross the Murray River and all eager to reach the Victorian gold fields. But not Allen Wilson. There was also a gold rush at Echunga not far from Westbrook Farm.

The peaceful tribe of the Peramangk aborigines which never troubled the district, was dying out from diseases introduced by the white settlers and from the loss of hereditary land. In 1850 there had been 150 houses and 250 people; in 1860 the inhabitants numbered 1000 and had the comfort of a "proper" Post Office and Telegraph: Letters and parcels were handed out from a house window. There was a Police Station, a Public Pound, Court House, drapers, blacksmiths and grocery store. Originally supplies had to be purchased at inflated prices from Mrs. Gloag at her husband's inn, until John Dunn opened a shop next to his steam flour mill and charged reasonably.

The Adelaide "Register" pictured the townsfolk as: the women wearing long dresses with bustles, paniers or crinolines. The men in bowler hats, moleskin trousers with boyangs and swallowtail coats. The boyangs seem most unlikely for A. Wilson, gentleman, as the Directory recorded him. Old birthday books name some of the Wilson friends. The Walter Paterson family. They had a governess, Miss Congreve, and later a tutor, Henry Bonnar. As this family remained close friends into the next generation there is a strong possibility that the Wilsons shared these teachers. Ellen would never have had time to give lessons and Allen would have lacked the inclination.

Other names were the John Dunns of flour mill fame, the Greenfields, the Thomas family, Paltridge, Gower, Hedges of Wistow. and Krichauffs and Gemmells of Bugle Ranges. Duncan McFarlane was the earliest and the principle town resident at "Auchendarroch" and Lachlan McFarlane kept the "Oakfield" Hotel and had a farm of the same name. Other hotels were Gray's Inn and the "Crown". The "Oakfield" at the end of Gawler Street was the halting place of the Royal Mail ‎(which also took passengers)‎. The driver, William Moyse, in light fawn livery, top coat with large buttons and a light bell topper, drove 5 horses with great style. His guard in scarlet coat and braided cap occupied a special seat on the top left hand corner at the back and announced their approach with the "yard of tin", a bugle as long as his arm.

Victor Dumas who was a famed Latin teacher, opened a school in his two storey house in Walker Street in 1855 and Marion said that some of "the boys" attended there for varying periods. All of them, with the exception of Will did attend Hahndorf College even if just "to finish". This was the landscape wherein the Wilsons moved.

The Manning house at Westbrook Farm was large enough to have a guest room ‎(some of the sons slept in the two attic rooms)‎. In 1865 when Marion was aged 11 there was a momentous occasion when the Reeves grandparents from Kangaroo Island came to stay. Samuel had brought Charlotte to the mainland for medical attention ‎(she did not go back to Kingscote and died in March 1866)‎ and came for a last visit to Mt. Barker. Marion was sent out to the paddock where her older brothers were working to bid them to the house. So rare was this event she was not believed until one of them discovered that she was wearing her best shoes instead of the every day heavy boots. They were convinced. Charlotte wore a beaded gown of rich brown silk so stiff and boned over its crinoline that when she took it off it stood without support on the floor. This so intrigued the children that all but the babies crept in to view so memorable sight, ‎(Described in the Charlotte segment of the Reeves history)‎

It was during this visit that the grandparents discovered to their horror that Marion could neither read nor write. From an early age she had been needed as both nursery and house maid and the luxury of lessons was not for her. They extracted a promise from Allen and Ellen that Marion should be sent to school "forthwith" and so she was. to the Misses Dumas, at Mt. Barker, walking each way of course. These ladies, sisters of Victor Dumas' school for boys. Marion was there less than two years, as when sister Nell married in February 1867 she was urgently needed again at home.

As will be seen in the section for Nell. she was married, by the arrangement of Allen and Oscar Lines, to his son John Oscar, a farmer of Dublin, north of Adelaide. The ceremony was held at St. James Blakiston with the incumbent officiating. With Nell crone Marion was once more a household drudge. They did have maid servants when finances permitted, particularly after the influx of Irish girls whose depot for dispersal to households was Mt. Barker. At this time there were five older brothers at home, four younger and two baby girls. Marion found, that with her mother "every-thing was for the boys, a girl didn't matter". To the older sons Allen was "The Old Man" though he was still in his forties. In old age, if Marion was asked about her father all she would say, and that scornfully and with a sniff. was "HIM"! He could not have shown much affection, if any, to his numerous offspring, 13 of whom grew to adulthood.

On August 31st 1867 the eldest Wilson son, now 22 ‎(Allen Frederick)‎ rented the Old Westbrook land ‎(Section 3729)‎ and also 3002 nearer West-brook Farm, to start farming for himself. It was arranged that he would pay rental of 50 pounds per annum as "an annuity for Ellen McLeod Wilson" as recorded at Lands Titles. His brothers remained to farm at home which was beginning to prosper. It was in this same year, on November 11th that the countryside was electrified by the Royal Visit of the Duke of Edinburgh, a son of Queen Victoria. This prince drove the coach himself from Echunga and must have passed by Westbrook Farm on his way to Mt. Barker where Mr. Gray of the Savings Bank entertained him. On leaving for Strathalbyn many riders ‎(no doubt Allen Wilson included)‎ of whom a number were lady equestrians, accompanied the royal personage as escort. All were soon thickly covered with dust. Allen Frederick did not stay long at Old Westbrook. He took up land between Callington and Monarto and was joined there by brothers Edward and Ernest which left Horace & Will to farm on behalf of their parents. Marion was sent to housekeep from time to time until Allen F. married in 1872.

1867 to the 1880s.

The people of Mt. Barker were finding wheat less and less profitable and turned to dairying, though potatoes, maize, barley and hay crops continued. The soil no longer yielded rich wheat harvests. In 1869 came the waste lands act and, if 20 percent of the land value was paid, the balance could wait for four years, so many left for Yorke Peninsula and paid one pound per acre for untouched land. In 1870 V. Crase took a lease of Old Westbrook for four years.

Whereas the older sons had only finished their education at T.W. Boehm's Hahndorf Academy Allen and Ellen were able to send their younger sons Arthur, Oscar, Samuel and Osmond there for most of their education and the two youngest daughters to "finish" at Hardwicke College, St Peters. In spite of the many departures, the town of Mt. Barker, continued to improve. Cleggetts and Patersons stayed and bought up the old farms. In 1880 the town barber was said to be partial to onions, bad tobacco and worse whisky so that scented hair oil was quite unnecessary as the odour breathed on the customer lasted a full week. The opposition, named Ashley, was so shaky that he would hand the razor to his customer to shave himself - so wrote Bob Schmidt in his book. Allen Wilson survived these hazards.

THE LAST YEARS

About this time Ellen and Allen built a new house on Section 3002 already mentioned several times. This was nearer Mt. Barker than Westbrook Farm on the opposite side of the road. The one photograph E.M.S. has shows it to have been ‎(it still is occupied)‎ of stone, with a bull-nose front verandah similar to Old Westbrook. The actual date cannot be ascertained as Lands Titles deals only with land, and not the buildings erected on it. However, the Wilson daughters Maude and Ada in the picture were wearing dresses with bustles. These were fashionable in the late 1870's and mid 1880's. This they called "New Westbrook", and it was the house familiar to the Wilson grandchildren.

Ellen had, perforce, learned quickly how to cope with a house and many children, but up to this point of recording their story, all has been adverse concerning Allen. His one saving grace appears to have been his keen interest in gardening. Not just the necessary vegetables, but flowers and trees of many kinds that came to flourish at New Westbrook. A description of how this appeared in the 1890's will appear presently.

There is no doubt that both were generously hospitable. When their daughter Edith Maude was in hospital shortly before she died in 1947 she looked about the ward with about 20 other women and said, "We always have a lot of people to stay, but this is ridiculous". An amused nurse passed this comment on to the writer's mother.

The younger sons avoided farming. The Directory for 1872 shows Arthur age only 16, as Manager of Dunn's Mill at Wolseley in the south-east of the state and Oscar aged 15 as a Warehouseman boarding at Evandale, East Adelaide. Later as others of the family moved to the city, they rented house at Edward Street, Norwood, and Marion was their housekeeper, but by 1883 Oscar and Osmond had married, Samuel did not appear at this address after 1883, Maude and Ada who had used the house when not at their board-ing school had gone their way and Marion returned home until required as housekeeper for brother Ernest at Carrieton in the north of the state.

Only Will was farming Westbrook but Sam, who already had the tuberculosis from which he died in 1887 aged 28, apparently aided him after leaving the city position, so long as he could. In May 1889 the wife or Edward, the 3rd son, died, and he returned to "New Westbrook" with his young children so that in her latter years Ellen once more looked after small people. Some of these were already sick with the tuberculosis from which their mother died and Ellen probably was infected by them as she was to die of the same disease.

It was at this time that Allen made his final gaffe. He mortgaged the coming seasons crops for 200 pounds without informing his sons or Ellen and departed to Sydney for a holiday. Naturally enough those living at New Westbrook were incensed at his action and on his return he found that Ellen had turned him out. Allen Frederick, the eldest son, of Yorketown, Yorke Peninsula agreed to take him in. Allen F.'s two children Mabel and Lancelot, remembered him only as a kind and gentle grandfather whose main interest was flower growing, if someone would first dig the ground for him. He had brought with him papers and records of his English forebears. These he offered to Allen F. who refused in the late Victoria phrase equivalent with "he couldn't care less" so Allen tossed them on the fire. So, without such clues E.M.S. has been unable to trace the Wilson family in earlier generations, or progress much further than Osmond Wilson and even his first Christopher of the East India Company's Navy is doubtful.

Towards the end of 1889 Allen's health failed and he was taken to a nursing home at East Terrace, Adelaide. He left a few of his belongings behind. A tiger claw mounted in gold ‎(ex-Uncle William Allen)‎ and a pair of black onyx Italian intaglio cuff links ‎(or perhaps shirt studs, it is hard to tell)‎ with classical heads incised and a silver tortoise which opens to show minute ivory dice. Such were worn by gentlemen as fobs and were useful to while away the time when travelling. E.M.S. has them now. Other belongings included the miniature on ivory of Allen's father Christopher and his gold fob with the family crest as a seal. These were given to son Oscar who with his wife Louise most frequently visited him from their home at East Adelaide, The items now belong to Margaret Vasey of Kew, Victoria, Oscar's grand-daughter.

ALLEN DIED at this nursing home on January 6th 1890, in his 70th year and was buried at West Terrace Cemetery. The death notice stated "A Colonist of 51 years". His death certificate gives the cause as "paralysis, chronic rheumatism and valvular disease of the heart". Marion said that the paralysis ‎(a stroke)‎ was the final cause.

Ellen lived on for eleven years. She looked after the three surviving children of Edward ‎(the Pugh aunts cared for the three who died - in their last days)‎, she mended the rift that had arisen between her and Marion who had married Charles Percy Lakeman in 1887, and had their four daughters to stay quite often. She sent great hampers of farm produce down to town by train to the Lakemans. The railway had reached Mt. Barker in 1883 so that transport to the city was now both quicker and easier.

Between them, Marion, her children and her sister Maude, gave an account of New Westbrook as they remembered it in the 1890's. It was recalled with real affection as a place both lovely and happy where fruit and flowers and the good things that the farm provided were all so much superior to those seen any where else. Crops, sheep and pigs and a dairy herd provided income as well as bark from wattle trees to the Mt. Barker tannery, wool, dairy products, dripping, eggs, honey and honey comb and beeswax. Indian hawkers travelled the country-side bringing items of cloth and haberdashery. They had their own meat, butter, cream, cheese, vegetables and fruit, jams and preserves, poultry, hams and bacon. Their wheat was ground into flour at Dunn's Mill. "New Westbrook" was very nearly self sufficient.

Allen's gardening left a legacy, thus - a hedge of English hawthorn bordered the road boundary, and dividing the outer paddocks from the house garden was a long hedge of intertwined roses, a small variety of pink and crimson, richly perfumed. A willow fringed creek ran through the property and even in summer it did not lack a small flow of water, so that seepage pools could be made for garden watering. Deep wells provided water for the house and in later years underground tanks were installed.

The garden was as near an English one as he could contrive, and the Australian climate permitted. Allen had planted Firethorn ‎(crataegus)‎, cedars and other English trees to mingle with the native acacias. There was an orchard of apples of many varieties, pears, plums and medlars, apricots, peaches, figs and cherry trees both black and red. Strawberries, red and black currants, gooseberries, raspberries and blackberries along the creek and every type of vegetable. In the flower garden, his particular joy, there was a wealth of English flowers. Fox-gloves ‎(sold to chemists for their digitalis)‎, violets, campernels, daffodils, ixias, snowdrops, crocus, anemone, narcissus, and the old type roses everywhere. A honeysuckle archway curved over the beehives. Viburnum trees and English lilacs, larkspur, bluebell, lavender, wall-flowers, night scented stocks, clove pinks, sweet william, verbena, dahlia, chrysanthemums and dozens of others.

In 1896 when son Edward returned home to "New Westbrook" with his children, unfortunately, Will, who had run both Westbrook Farm and New Westbrook for so many years, did not agree so Will departed and Edward stayed on until 1902, a year after Ellen died and the property was sold.

ELLEN DIED at the age of 74, of tuberculosis ‎(her original death certificate is at Torrens Titles)‎ on 21 Apr 1901 and she was buried at the Blakiston Cemetery of St. James' Church. Son Will paid 80 pounds for a headstone, but typical of Will, he did not follow this up and the monumental mason having accepted the cash did not bother to erect the stone so no record remains there, just two bare earth mounds side by side, path VI in the St. James Register:

HER OBITUARY - from the Adelaide "Observer" of April 1901:-
"Mrs. Ellen Wilson, relict of the late Mr. Allen Wilson of Westbrook, Mt. Barker who died on Sunday at the age of 75 ‎(not until the Sept. of 1901)‎ was, says the Mt. Barker "Courier", a very early colonist having arrived in South Australia from Tasmania in the "Yatala" ‎(error- the "Minerva")‎ commanded by her brother-in-law Capt. Buckland in 1838 ‎(error she arrived on Nov. 3rd 1839, the Capt. was Robt. Pritchard)‎. The deceased lady was a daughter of Mr. Samuel Reeves, one of the first. Tasmanian settlers who occupied the position of Government explorer for many years and was also the representative of an English cattle company. After marriage with Mr. Wilson the couple first settled at Gawler River, afterwards removing to Westbrook. Mt. Barker. There was a family of 15 children, 11 of whom survive:- Mrs. J.O. Lines; Mr. A.F. Wilson, Mallala; Mr. E.M. Wilson of Jamestown; Mr. Edward P. Wilson of Westbrook; Mr. W.A. Wilson, Mt. Barker; Mrs. C.P. Lakeman, Grange; Mr. Arthur Wilson, Adelaide; Mr. O.S. Wilson of Messrs. Brice, Wilson & Co. Adelaide; Mr. O.H. Wilson of the National Bank, Melbourne; Miss E.M. Wilson and Mrs. H.P. Knight of Wolseley".

It was after Ellen's death and the settling of her estate ‎(she left it in equal shares to her surviving children)‎ that the question of her legal ownership arose. However, a statutory declaration, application No 24405, finally solved this problem.

Ellen gave each of her Lakeman grandchildren a little cup and saucer when each was about 6 years old. To Eunice a fluted, white, heavy china cup with a lot of gold and the words "Forget Me Not", and made in Germany on the base. Handle and saucer are missing; given in 1893. When Eunice and china got together there was often disaster. Edith's does not seem to have survived, but Olive's with an all-over pattern of blue on white of very thin china, and Violet's also thin and of white china, has delicate pattern in greys and blues and fluted edges. Both these are "as new" and E.M.S. has all three.

Edward continued at New Westbrook until the estate was sold in 1902. At Old Westbrook the original bread oven in the detached kitchen was only removed in 1980. Arthur Edward Braendler purchased first. The next owner was Johan Gottlieb Liebelt ‎(1853-1938)‎ of Friedrickstadt who passed at least Old Westbrook to his son Carl Louis Liebelt in 1926. ‎(The father purchased in 1909)‎. In 1982 Carl's son Louis E. Liebelt was at Old Westbrook but the family moved to Victoria in 1989. The present owner ‎(1991)‎ has not been traced. New Westbrook is also occupied by some of the Liebelt family, and Westbrook Farm held together for many years in spite of termites was eventually replaced by a brick house:

A final note on Ellen's belongings, E.M.S. has two of the plates of her tea set, white china patterned with sprays of lilac, all that is left of the set.
Biographical Notes MT. BARKER AS THE WILSONS KNEW IT in the early days. Bob Schmidt's book "Mountain upon the Plain" published 1983 describes it well. The early settler, no matter how well educated, was described as wearing "the bush-man's garb of blue shirt, soiled cabbage tree hat with a broad black ribbon, booted and spurred and with the indispensable stock whip in hand and smoking a short black pipe". That "Gentleman" Wilson ever appeared thus is hard to believe and going by the accounts of his children he never did.

The land was beautiful and fertile "with deep black loam with a rich sward of grass and timber spaced as in an English park". The original sheep grazing, due to scab. was soon abandoned for the growing of wheat which was to give rich harvests for many years. Soon the pisé huts and small dwellings gave way to good buildings of the local freestone and limestone and later of the excellent bricks still made at Littlehampton nearby. The earliest inhabitants reached Mt. Barker via Glen Osmond, Crafers, Hahndorf and Littlehampton and took several days either by bullock waggon or carrying their belongings as horses were still scarce. ‎(A half hour by the south eastern freeway by car is now the norm.)‎ The wagons had to negotiate very steep inclines with timber drags as brakes to the vehicles.

By 1845 or 1847 when it is presumed the Wilsons made their way up through what was then called The Tiers there was a road of sorts to Mt. Barker and the toll gate at Mt. Osmond had abolished its system of fees. That building is still in place. Perhaps Ellen and the children escaped the rough wagon as a regular mail service had been inaugurated by Rounsvell who also carried passengers. Cobb & Co. followed, then Hill & Co. did the same, in sequence.

By 1851 Mt. Barker was the centre of a wheat boom and this could be the reason for Allen Wilson's recovery from bankruptcy and the ability to purchase the 4th section of 80 acres in January 1859. Many farms became almost self sufficient as did the Wilsons', eventually. Food prices were stable for a long time. Beef and mutton were one shilling per pound salt beef and pork 9 pence kangaroo the same and wild ducks were 1 shilling each. Quail were 6 pence. Fresh butter cost 2 shillings and 6 pence and salt butter 9 pence. Milk was 10 pence a quart, flour 55 shillings for a barrel of 196 pounds. Sugar was 6 pence a pound and tea 3 shillings and 6 pence.

The Church of England, St. James, built of stone, at Blakiston, and it the old Gothic style, was opened in 1847. Ellen was to be buried in its churchyard more than 50 years later and the two year old Maria who died in 1849 must have been one of the earliest interments. Until 1860 when an Anglican Church was built at Mt. Barker the people rode or walked out to St. James a mile and a half from the town, on Sundays to its small village setting. The Rev. Pollitt conducted a school there but there is no record of any of the Wilson children attending. The year 1852 saw the exit overland ‎(it took 3 weeks)‎ of a large proportion of the male population of South Australia, infected with gold fever and thousands passed through Mt. Barker to the ferry several miles ahead at Wellington, to cross the Murray River and all eager to reach the Victorian gold fields. But not Allen Wilson. There was also a gold rush at Echunga not far from Westbrook Farm.

The peaceful tribe of the Peramangk aborigines which never troubled the district, was dying out from diseases introduced by the white settlers and from the loss of hereditary land. In 1850 there had been 150 houses and 250 people; in 1860 the inhabitants numbered 1000 and had the comfort of a "proper" Post Office and Telegraph: Letters and parcels were handed out from a house window. There was a Police Station, a Public Pound, Court House, drapers, blacksmiths and grocery store. Originally supplies had to be purchased at inflated prices from Mrs. Gloag at her husband's inn, until John Dunn opened a shop next to his steam flour mill and charged reasonably.

The Adelaide "Register" pictured the townsfolk as: the women wearing long dresses with bustles, paniers or crinolines. The men in bowler hats, moleskin trousers with boyangs and swallowtail coats. The boyangs seem most unlikely for A. Wilson, gentleman, as the Directory recorded him. Old birthday books name some of the Wilson friends. The Walter Paterson family. They had a governess, Miss Congreve, and later a tutor, Henry Bonnar. As this family remained close friends into the next generation there is a strong possibility that the Wilsons shared these teachers. Ellen would never have had time to give lessons and Allen would have lacked the inclination.

Other names were the John Dunns of flour mill fame, the Greenfields, the Thomas family, Paltridge, Gower, Hedges of Wistow. and Krichauffs and Gemmells of Bugle Ranges. Duncan McFarlane was the earliest and the principle town resident at "Auchendarroch" and Lachlan McFarlane kept the "Oakfield" Hotel and had a farm of the same name. Other hotels were Gray's Inn and the "Crown". The "Oakfield" at the end of Gawler Street was the halting place of the Royal Mail ‎(which also took passengers)‎. The driver, William Moyse, in light fawn livery, top coat with large buttons and a light bell topper, drove 5 horses with great style. His guard in scarlet coat and braided cap occupied a special seat on the top left hand corner at the back and announced their approach with the "yard of tin", a bugle as long as his arm.

Victor Dumas who was a famed Latin teacher, opened a school in his two storey house in Walker Street in 1855 and Marion said that some of "the boys" attended there for varying periods. All of them, with the exception of Will did attend Hahndorf College even if just "to finish". This was the landscape wherein the Wilsons moved.

The Manning house at Westbrook Farm was large enough to have a guest room ‎(some of the sons slept in the two attic rooms)‎. In 1865 when Marion was aged 11 there was a momentous occasion when the Reeves grandparents from Kangaroo Island came to stay. Samuel had brought Charlotte to the mainland for medical attention ‎(she did not go back to Kingscote and died in March 1866)‎ and came for a last visit to Mt. Barker. Marion was sent out to the paddock where her older brothers were working to bid them to the house. So rare was this event she was not believed until one of them discovered that she was wearing her best shoes instead of the every day heavy boots. They were convinced. Charlotte wore a beaded gown of rich brown silk so stiff and boned over its crinoline that when she took it off it stood without support on the floor. This so intrigued the children that all but the babies crept in to view so memorable sight, ‎(Described in the Charlotte segment of the Reeves history)‎

It was during this visit that the grandparents discovered to their horror that Marion could neither read nor write. From an early age she had been needed as both nursery and house maid and the luxury of lessons was not for her. They extracted a promise from Allen and Ellen that Marion should be sent to school "forthwith" and so she was. to the Misses Dumas, at Mt. Barker, walking each way of course. These ladies, sisters of Victor Dumas' school for boys. Marion was there less than two years, as when sister Nell married in February 1867 she was urgently needed again at home.

As will be seen in the section for Nell. she was married, by the arrangement of Allen and Oscar Lines, to his son John Oscar, a farmer of Dublin, north of Adelaide. The ceremony was held at St. James Blakiston with the incumbent officiating. With Nell crone Marion was once more a household drudge. They did have maid servants when finances permitted, particularly after the influx of Irish girls whose depot for dispersal to households was Mt. Barker. At this time there were five older brothers at home, four younger and two baby girls. Marion found, that with her mother "every-thing was for the boys, a girl didn't matter". To the older sons Allen was "The Old Man" though he was still in his forties. In old age, if Marion was asked about her father all she would say, and that scornfully and with a sniff. was "HIM"! He could not have shown much affection, if any, to his numerous offspring, 13 of whom grew to adulthood.

On August 31st 1867 the eldest Wilson son, now 22 ‎(Allen Frederick)‎ rented the Old Westbrook land ‎(Section 3729)‎ and also 3002 nearer West-brook Farm, to start farming for himself. It was arranged that he would pay rental of 50 pounds per annum as "an annuity for Ellen McLeod Wilson" as recorded at Lands Titles. His brothers remained to farm at home which was beginning to prosper. It was in this same year, on November 11th that the countryside was electrified by the Royal Visit of the Duke of Edinburgh, a son of Queen Victoria. This prince drove the coach himself from Echunga and must have passed by Westbrook Farm on his way to Mt. Barker where Mr. Gray of the Savings Bank entertained him. On leaving for Strathalbyn many riders ‎(no doubt Allen Wilson included)‎ of whom a number were lady equestrians, accompanied the royal personage as escort. All were soon thickly covered with dust. Allen Frederick did not stay long at Old Westbrook. He took up land between Callington and Monarto and was joined there by brothers Edward and Ernest which left Horace & Will to farm on behalf of their parents. Marion was sent to housekeep from time to time until Allen F. married in 1872.

1867 to the 1880s.

The people of Mt. Barker were finding wheat less and less profitable and turned to dairying, though potatoes, maize, barley and hay crops continued. The soil no longer yielded rich wheat harvests. In 1869 came the waste lands act and, if 20 percent of the land value was paid, the balance could wait for four years, so many left for Yorke Peninsula and paid one pound per acre for untouched land. In 1870 V. Crase took a lease of Old Westbrook for four years.

Whereas the older sons had only finished their education at T.W. Boehm's Hahndorf Academy Allen and Ellen were able to send their younger sons Arthur, Oscar, Samuel and Osmond there for most of their education and the two youngest daughters to "finish" at Hardwicke College, St Peters. In spite of the many departures, the town of Mt. Barker, continued to improve. Cleggetts and Patersons stayed and bought up the old farms. In 1880 the town barber was said to be partial to onions, bad tobacco and worse whisky so that scented hair oil was quite unnecessary as the odour breathed on the customer lasted a full week. The opposition, named Ashley, was so shaky that he would hand the razor to his customer to shave himself - so wrote Bob Schmidt in his book. Allen Wilson survived these hazards.

THE LAST YEARS

About this time Ellen and Allen built a new house on Section 3002 already mentioned several times. This was nearer Mt. Barker than Westbrook Farm on the opposite side of the road. The one photograph E.M.S. has shows it to have been ‎(it still is occupied)‎ of stone, with a bull-nose front verandah similar to Old Westbrook. The actual date cannot be ascertained as Lands Titles deals only with land, and not the buildings erected on it. However, the Wilson daughters Maude and Ada in the picture were wearing dresses with bustles. These were fashionable in the late 1870's and mid 1880's. This they called "New Westbrook", and it was the house familiar to the Wilson grandchildren.

Ellen had, perforce, learned quickly how to cope with a house and many children, but up to this point of recording their story, all has been adverse concerning Allen. His one saving grace appears to have been his keen interest in gardening. Not just the necessary vegetables, but flowers and trees of many kinds that came to flourish at New Westbrook. A description of how this appeared in the 1890's will appear presently.

There is no doubt that both were generously hospitable. When their daughter Edith Maude was in hospital shortly before she died in 1947 she looked about the ward with about 20 other women and said, "We always have a lot of people to stay, but this is ridiculous". An amused nurse passed this comment on to the writer's mother.

The younger sons avoided farming. The Directory for 1872 shows Arthur age only 16, as Manager of Dunn's Mill at Wolseley in the south-east of the state and Oscar aged 15 as a Warehouseman boarding at Evandale, East Adelaide. Later as others of the family moved to the city, they rented house at Edward Street, Norwood, and Marion was their housekeeper, but by 1883 Oscar and Osmond had married, Samuel did not appear at this address after 1883, Maude and Ada who had used the house when not at their board-ing school had gone their way and Marion returned home until required as housekeeper for brother Ernest at Carrieton in the north of the state.

Only Will was farming Westbrook but Sam, who already had the tuberculosis from which he died in 1887 aged 28, apparently aided him after leaving the city position, so long as he could. In May 1889 the wife or Edward, the 3rd son, died, and he returned to "New Westbrook" with his young children so that in her latter years Ellen once more looked after small people. Some of these were already sick with the tuberculosis from which their mother died and Ellen probably was infected by them as she was to die of the same disease.

It was at this time that Allen made his final gaffe. He mortgaged the coming seasons crops for 200 pounds without informing his sons or Ellen and departed to Sydney for a holiday. Naturally enough those living at New Westbrook were incensed at his action and on his return he found that Ellen had turned him out. Allen Frederick, the eldest son, of Yorketown, Yorke Peninsula agreed to take him in. Allen F.'s two children Mabel and Lancelot, remembered him only as a kind and gentle grandfather whose main interest was flower growing, if someone would first dig the ground for him. He had brought with him papers and records of his English forebears. These he offered to Allen F. who refused in the late Victoria phrase equivalent with "he couldn't care less" so Allen tossed them on the fire. So, without such clues E.M.S. has been unable to trace the Wilson family in earlier generations, or progress much further than Osmond Wilson and even his first Christopher of the East India Company's Navy is doubtful.

Towards the end of 1889 Allen's health failed and he was taken to a nursing home at East Terrace, Adelaide. He left a few of his belongings behind. A tiger claw mounted in gold ‎(ex-Uncle William Allen)‎ and a pair of black onyx Italian intaglio cuff links ‎(or perhaps shirt studs, it is hard to tell)‎ with classical heads incised and a silver tortoise which opens to show minute ivory dice. Such were worn by gentlemen as fobs and were useful to while away the time when travelling. E.M.S. has them now. Other belongings included the miniature on ivory of Allen's father Christopher and his gold fob with the family crest as a seal. These were given to son Oscar who with his wife Louise most frequently visited him from their home at East Adelaide, The items now belong to Margaret Vasey of Kew, Victoria, Oscar's grand-daughter.

ALLEN DIED at this nursing home on January 6th 1890, in his 70th year and was buried at West Terrace Cemetery. The death notice stated "A Colonist of 51 years". His death certificate gives the cause as "paralysis, chronic rheumatism and valvular disease of the heart". Marion said that the paralysis ‎(a stroke)‎ was the final cause.

Ellen lived on for eleven years. She looked after the three surviving children of Edward ‎(the Pugh aunts cared for the three who died - in their last days)‎, she mended the rift that had arisen between her and Marion who had married Charles Percy Lakeman in 1887, and had their four daughters to stay quite often. She sent great hampers of farm produce down to town by train to the Lakemans. The railway had reached Mt. Barker in 1883 so that transport to the city was now both quicker and easier.

Between them, Marion, her children and her sister Maude, gave an account of New Westbrook as they remembered it in the 1890's. It was recalled with real affection as a place both lovely and happy where fruit and flowers and the good things that the farm provided were all so much superior to those seen any where else. Crops, sheep and pigs and a dairy herd provided income as well as bark from wattle trees to the Mt. Barker tannery, wool, dairy products, dripping, eggs, honey and honey comb and beeswax. Indian hawkers travelled the country-side bringing items of cloth and haberdashery. They had their own meat, butter, cream, cheese, vegetables and fruit, jams and preserves, poultry, hams and bacon. Their wheat was ground into flour at Dunn's Mill. "New Westbrook" was very nearly self sufficient.

Allen's gardening left a legacy, thus - a hedge of English hawthorn bordered the road boundary, and dividing the outer paddocks from the house garden was a long hedge of intertwined roses, a small variety of pink and crimson, richly perfumed. A willow fringed creek ran through the property and even in summer it did not lack a small flow of water, so that seepage pools could be made for garden watering. Deep wells provided water for the house and in later years underground tanks were installed.

The garden was as near an English one as he could contrive, and the Australian climate permitted. Allen had planted Firethorn ‎(crataegus)‎, cedars and other English trees to mingle with the native acacias. There was an orchard of apples of many varieties, pears, plums and medlars, apricots, peaches, figs and cherry trees both black and red. Strawberries, red and black currants, gooseberries, raspberries and blackberries along the creek and every type of vegetable. In the flower garden, his particular joy, there was a wealth of English flowers. Fox-gloves ‎(sold to chemists for their digitalis)‎, violets, campernels, daffodils, ixias, snowdrops, crocus, anemone, narcissus, and the old type roses everywhere. A honeysuckle archway curved over the beehives. Viburnum trees and English lilacs, larkspur, bluebell, lavender, wall-flowers, night scented stocks, clove pinks, sweet william, verbena, dahlia, chrysanthemums and dozens of others.

In 1896 when son Edward returned home to "New Westbrook" with his children, unfortunately, Will, who had run both Westbrook Farm and New Westbrook for so many years, did not agree so Will departed and Edward stayed on until 1902, a year after Ellen died and the property was sold.

ELLEN DIED at the age of 74, of tuberculosis ‎(her original death certificate is at Torrens Titles)‎ on 21 Apr 1901 and she was buried at the Blakiston Cemetery of St. James' Church. Son Will paid 80 pounds for a headstone, but typical of Will, he did not follow this up and the monumental mason having accepted the cash did not bother to erect the stone so no record remains there, just two bare earth mounds side by side, path VI in the St. James Register:

HER OBITUARY - from the Adelaide "Observer" of April 1901:-
"Mrs. Ellen Wilson, relict of the late Mr. Allen Wilson of Westbrook, Mt. Barker who died on Sunday at the age of 75 ‎(not until the Sept. of 1901)‎ was, says the Mt. Barker "Courier", a very early colonist having arrived in South Australia from Tasmania in the "Yatala" ‎(error- the "Minerva")‎ commanded by her brother-in-law Capt. Buckland in 1838 ‎(error she arrived on Nov. 3rd 1839, the Capt. was Robt. Pritchard)‎. The deceased lady was a daughter of Mr. Samuel Reeves, one of the first. Tasmanian settlers who occupied the position of Government explorer for many years and was also the representative of an English cattle company. After marriage with Mr. Wilson the couple first settled at Gawler River, afterwards removing to Westbrook. Mt. Barker. There was a family of 15 children, 11 of whom survive:- Mrs. J.O. Lines; Mr. A.F. Wilson, Mallala; Mr. E.M. Wilson of Jamestown; Mr. Edward P. Wilson of Westbrook; Mr. W.A. Wilson, Mt. Barker; Mrs. C.P. Lakeman, Grange; Mr. Arthur Wilson, Adelaide; Mr. O.S. Wilson of Messrs. Brice, Wilson & Co. Adelaide; Mr. O.H. Wilson of the National Bank, Melbourne; Miss E.M. Wilson and Mrs. H.P. Knight of Wolseley".

It was after Ellen's death and the settling of her estate ‎(she left it in equal shares to her surviving children)‎ that the question of her legal ownership arose. However, a statutory declaration, application No 24405, finally solved this problem.

Ellen gave each of her Lakeman grandchildren a little cup and saucer when each was about 6 years old. To Eunice a fluted, white, heavy china cup with a lot of gold and the words "Forget Me Not", and made in Germany on the base. Handle and saucer are missing; given in 1893. When Eunice and china got together there was often disaster. Edith's does not seem to have survived, but Olive's with an all-over pattern of blue on white of very thin china, and Violet's also thin and of white china, has delicate pattern in greys and blues and fluted edges. Both these are "as new" and E.M.S. has all three.

Edward continued at New Westbrook until the estate was sold in 1902. At Old Westbrook the original bread oven in the detached kitchen was only removed in 1980. Arthur Edward Braendler purchased first. The next owner was Johan Gottlieb Liebelt ‎(1853-1938)‎ of Friedrickstadt who passed at least Old Westbrook to his son Carl Louis Liebelt in 1926. ‎(The father purchased in 1909)‎. In 1982 Carl's son Louis E. Liebelt was at Old Westbrook but the family moved to Victoria in 1989. The present owner ‎(1991)‎ has not been traced. New Westbrook is also occupied by some of the Liebelt family, and Westbrook Farm held together for many years in spite of termites was eventually replaced by a brick house:

A final note on Ellen's belongings, E.M.S. has two of the plates of her tea set, white china patterned with sprays of lilac, all that is left of the set.

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Sources

Source
Eunice Margaret Stevenson
Biographical Notes Mountain on the Plain
Publication: District Council of Mount Barker, ISBN: 0959120602, 1983
Biographical Notes Mountain on the Plain
Publication: District Council of Mount Barker, ISBN: 0959120602, 1983
Biographical Notes Mountain on the Plain
Publication: District Council of Mount Barker, ISBN: 0959120602, 1983

View Sources for ...


Media

Multimedia Object
1875 Allen Wilson1875 Allen Wilson  ‎(M404)‎
Type: Photo

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Family with Parents
Father
Christopher WILSON ‎(I5763)‎
Birth 1775
Death 18 January 1836 ‎(Age 61)‎ Wincheap, Kent, England
15 years
Mother
 
Mary ALLEN ‎(I5764)‎
Baptism 8 May 1790 Lydd, Kent, England
Death 4 September 1829 ‎(Age 39)‎ London, England

Marriage: 13 July 1813 -- All Saints Church, Lydd, Kent, England
5 years
#1
Sister
Elizabeth WILSON ‎(I9908)‎
Birth circa 1818 43 27
Death 15 May 1835 ‎(Age 17)‎ Lydd, Kent, England
2 years
#2
Allen WILSON ‎(I5761)‎
Birth 6 April 1820 45 29 England
Death 6 January 1890 ‎(Age 69)‎ South Australia, Australia
2 years
#3
Brother
Christopher WILSON ‎(I9909)‎
Birth 1822 47 31 London, England
Death 1823 ‎(Age 12 months)‎
Family with Ellen McLeod REEVES
Allen WILSON ‎(I5761)‎
Birth 6 April 1820 45 29 England
Death 6 January 1890 ‎(Age 69)‎ South Australia, Australia
6 years
Wife
 
Ellen McLeod REEVES ‎(I5762)‎
Birth 19 September 1826 36 30 Evandale, Tasmania, Australia
Death 21 April 1901 ‎(Age 74)‎ New Westbrook, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia

Marriage: 15 February 1843 -- Ludlow House, Gumeracha, South Australia, Australia
9 months
#1
Daughter
Ellen Allen Nell WILSON ‎(I9891)‎
Birth 18 November 1843 23 17 Buckland Park, Port Gawler, South Australia, Australia
Death 7 August 1933 ‎(Age 89)‎ Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
15 months
#2
Son
Allen Frederick WILSON ‎(I9892)‎
Birth 2 March 1845 24 18 Buckland Park, Port Gawler, South Australia, Australia
Death 30 June 1933 ‎(Age 88)‎ 22 Dover Street, Malvern, South Australia, Australia
16 months
#3
Daughter
Maria Louisa WILSON ‎(I9893)‎
Birth 7 July 1846 26 19
Death 20 February 1849 ‎(Age 2)‎
15 months
#4
Son
Ernest McLeod WILSON ‎(I9894)‎
Birth 22 September 1847 27 21 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 5 February 1914 ‎(Age 66)‎
2 years
#5
Son
Edward Percival WILSON ‎(I9895)‎
Birth 25 June 1849 29 22 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 25 July 1911 ‎(Age 62)‎ Campbelltown, South Australia, Australia
15 months
#6
Son
Horace WILSON ‎(I9896)‎
Birth 26 September 1850 30 24 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death circa 1886 ‎(Age 35)‎ Balhannah, South Australia, Australia
19 months
#7
Son
William Allen Will WILSON ‎(I9897)‎
Birth 21 April 1852 32 25 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 22 April 1945 ‎(Age 93)‎ Memorial Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
2 years
#8
Daughter
Marion WILSON ‎(I4690)‎
Birth 2 February 1854 33 27 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 16 August 1942 ‎(Age 88)‎ Royston Park, South Australia, Australia
2 years
#9
Son
Arthur WILSON ‎(I9898)‎
Birth 17 June 1856 36 29 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 7 November 1926 ‎(Age 70)‎ Marion Street, Unley, South Australia, Australia
16 months
#10
Son
Oscar Stirling WILSON ‎(I9899)‎
Birth 16 October 1857 37 31 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 30 January 1909 ‎(Age 51)‎ Mosman, New South Wales, Australia
16 months
#11
Son
Christopher Samuel Sam WILSON ‎(I9900)‎
Birth 18 February 1859 38 32 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 4 December 1887 ‎(Age 28)‎ New Westbrook, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
19 months
#12
Son
Reginald WILSON ‎(I9901)‎
Birth 27 September 1860 40 34 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 27 September 1860 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
13 months
#13
Son
Osmond Henry WILSON ‎(I9902)‎
Birth 4 November 1861 41 35 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 11 December 1945 ‎(Age 84)‎ Fernholme, Sandringham, Victoria, Australia
2 years
#14
Daughter
Edith Maude WILSON ‎(I9903)‎
Birth 23 September 1863 43 37 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 8 March 1947 ‎(Age 83)‎ Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
2 years
#15
Daughter
Ada Mary WILSON ‎(I9904)‎
Birth 13 September 1865 45 38 Westbrook Farm, Mount Barker, South Australia, Australia
Death 14 August 1947 ‎(Age 81)‎ Grenfell, New South Wales, Australia