Shep's Place Family Tree

Miles Harold BROWN
1956 Harold Brown
Miles Harold BROWN  ‎(I4)‎
Given Names: Miles Harold
Surname: BROWN

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 16 July 1911 30 21 Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Death: 11 November 1983 ‎(Age 72)‎ Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida, USA
Personal Facts and Details
Birth 16 July 1911 30 21 Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA


Note: Willie came home to Mason to have her first baby at the home of her parents. Her sister Katie Foglesong was there, too. Sadly, their mother had recently died. Miles Harold Brown was born on a summer's day in July at the Ruttencutter family home.
Biographical Notes circa 1920 ‎(Age 8)‎ Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA


Hide Details Note: by his teacher Lena L. Gibbs
For reading Harold started at 95, then 97, then 99 thereafter. For writing, he got a 90, then 93, 94, 95, then stayed at 97. For numbers, later to be his best subject, he started with 90, 93, 95 then 99 from then on. He had four large gold stars on his card. He consistently got 100 for deportment, and he didn't miss a day of school.

Biographical Notes circa 1925 ‎(Age 13)‎

Hide Details Note: Camping
Harold used to go camping with his cousin Donald Foglesong and their fathers, Miles Brown and Will Foglesong. Perhaps younger brothers, Max Brown and Sam Foglesong, the "babies," also got to go along. The mothers, Willie Brown and her sister Katie Foglesong made the tent. They used to put up the tent by a stream, then dig a hole by the steam where it would be cool--their refrigerator. They always went fishing and caught catfish which they cooked and ate by the campfire.

Newspaper Article 1931 ‎(Age 19)‎ Athens, Athens County, Ohio, USA


Source: Athens Messenger


Hide Details Note: Athens Messenger Sports
When the football season of 1931 rolled around Don Peden foresaw that he was going to be short-handed in the matter of tailbacks for Rush Kepler was the only man available for the position. Something had to be done to guard against a gaping hole in this position in the event Kepler was injured. Moreover, looking a full year ahead, Don realized that when Kepler graduated he wouldn't have a kicker and passer for the '32 season unless something was done along the line of developing one immediately. Casting around for a likely prospect, a third-string fullback, one Harold Brown by name, was elected as Kepler's understudy. Brown had never done any kicking and what passing he had done was confined almost entirely to simply tossing the ball around the two or three other teammates in practice. But the keen Peden eye saw possibilities that were not apparent to the casual observer, even to a more diligent onlooker.

From that time on Brown's practice sessions were devoted to long drills in passing and kicking with Kepler, as well as the coaches, devoting considerable time to teaching his understudy. Brownie learned quickly. He progressed rapidly through that season and when practice started for 1932 he was far enough along to dispel any fears Peden might have had about the loss of Kepler being irreparable. Brownie's performance at Indiana left no doubt as to his being capable of handling the job. One of Brown's biggest attributes was his coolness under fire. He refused to let anything worry him. Seldom, if ever, did he appear to be hurried in getting away a kick or a pass, even though there may have been times when he actually was rushed plenty.

Then, the in Navy game, came Brown's crowning performance. Navy had a highly-publicized halfback from Hawaii by name, Gordon Chung-Hoon. Eastern newspaper scribes came to the Ohio-Navy game to watch Chung-Hoon. But they wrote about Harold Brown. He was the outstanding player on the field that day. He threw a long pass to Elden Armbrust that paved the way for Ohio's first touchdown, and he tossed another to Joe Sintic for the second touchdown.
That touchdown pass to Sintic, Don Peden says, was the most deliberate play he has seen in his 12 years at Ohio. And anyone who witnessed the play will not hesitate to agree that it was deliberate to say the least. As called, the pass was supposed to go to George Collins, Ohio's right end. But the Bobcats were deep in a Navy territory and the Middies, sensing what was coming, managed to lock Collins up so that he could not get down to take the toss. Hence, when Brown, after faking a try at the line, faded back and looked towards the goal, he saw no receiver. For what seemed ages to us in the stands--and also to those on the bench, Peden admits--Brown trotted around behind the line of scrimmage, leisurely dodging would-be tacklers with a nonchalance that was amazing. How long he did this, actually, probably no one knows. But finally he saw Sintic across the goal line, flipped the ball to him and Ohio had its second touchdown.
‎(related by Don Peden to G. E. Mitchell)‎

Newspaper Article 2 March 1932 ‎(Age 20)‎ Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia, USA


Hide Details Note: The Herald Dispatch
page 7:
For your approval, we offer this morning the first annual All-Buckeye basketball selections of The Herald-Dispatch. The men named on the first and second squads represent the ultimate in Buckeye Conference society not only in the mind of the writer, who has seen each player perform numerous times, but also in the opinions of coaches, officials and newspapermen throughout the league.
Captain Ramey hunter, Marshall's great athlete, is moved from his regular center position to a forward where he pairs with Harold Brown of Ohio University on the first team. The season just closing marking Marshall's entrance into the league, Hunter thus becomes the first wearer of the Green and White to be honored with an All-Buckeye berth.

BROWN--Handicapped by illness in early season, but he came through in every important game. Best ball handler on Ohio's championship squad. Controls ball good portion of every game and rarely makes bad pass. Plays in pivot well and is best shot in league swinging from the pivot. Was best of loop's forwards. One of two West Virginia boys on team, Hunter being other. Graduates this June.

Newspaper Article between 1930 and 1940 ‎(Age 18)‎ Athens, Athens County, Ohio, USA


Hide Details Note: Max Brown's clippings
Max Brown kept an athletic scrapbook which featured his older brother Harold. The following are some of the exerpts which mention Big Reds ‎[Parkersburgh High School]‎ or the Bobcats ‎[Ohio University]‎, some of which are not dated or identified by newspaper:

OHIO U. STAR
‎[Photograph of Harold holding basketball - Harold Brown Center]‎
The following exerpts are quoted from the Athens Messenger under date of Feb. 11, 1932, and were written by Grover Mitchell, sports editor of the Athens Messenger. You may perhaps be interested in them.
"Harold Brown, Ohio's stellar all-round athlete, playing perhaps the greatest game of his career, stood head and shoulders above everyone else on the floor last night. But even his Herculean efforts to win the ball game single-handed went for naught.
It was Brownie who kept the Bobcats in the ball game all the way. He sent two field goals through the hoop in the first half and then really got going in the second stanze to count five times from the floor and four times from the free line. His total for the night was 18 points, more than half of the Bobcats' total."
"Harold Brown threatens to uphold the prestige of Parkersburg athletes in the collegiate world with his brilliant play at center for the Ohio University basketball team.
The big boy looked to be the best man on the floor during the Ohio Wesleyan game this week and his 18 points were more than half the number the entire Ohio team was able to score against the Methodists.
Brown is cool as an ice cake during the most heated minutes of the battle and he failed to blow a single good opportunity to score. His defensive work was above par and if coach Grover was favored with five athletes whose abilities equalled those of Brown there is little doubt as to who the conference champions would be this season."

OHIO U. TEAM OFF FOR NAVY
Harold Brown of Parkersburg Is Among Bobcats Heading Eastward
Athens, Ohio, Oct. 14.--Ohio University's football machine started toward Annapolis Thursday night with full steam registered for the battle with navy Saturday.
New aerial plays issued this week have been working successfully and Peden expects to use more passes than have been used in all of the games this year. Harold Brown, leading ball tosser, has shown improvement this week in his throwing. He has been passing the ball with more accuracy and more force."

LOCAL BOYS TO MEET IN GAME
Harold Brown and Harlan Baumberger Will Oppose Each Other
"Parkersburg will be well represented in the Ohio University-Navy game tomorrow as two former Big Red players will be opposing each other. Harold Brown is expected to play a prominent part in the Bobcat offense as a halfback while Harlan Baumberger probably will see service at a halfback post for the Middies.
Baumberger has participated in all of the Navy games this year, being frequently substituted for Chung-Hoon, the Navy's famous ball carrier."

NAVY BEATEN, 14-0 BY OHIO'S PASSES
continued from Page 1.
Both teams wages a bitter battle in the line, and if anything the Tars held a shade advantage in general defensive play from this angle, but the accurate and varied passing emulated by Harold Brown, veteran back of the aggregation from Athens, held the Naval lads in a maze of bewilderment throughout. His passes proved the main factor in Navy's undoing, one putting the ball in position to score the first touchdown and another, splendidly executed, was directly responsible for the other.
Brown, playing tail back in the Warner system as employed by the Bobcats, was the bright particular star of the game. Not only was he a deadly passer, but he punted in splendid fashion and was a bear in the secondary defense."

MANY LOCAL FANS TO SEE GAME AT OHIO UNIVERSITY
To Journey To Athens Wednesday To See Marietts
PLAY BOB CATS
Jimmy Clark and Harold Brown to Be In Line-Up
"Many local basketball enthusiasts are making plans already to be in Athens Wednesday evening in order to see Marietta clash with the bob-Cats on the Ohio University hard wood court.
In addition to this, there is the second reason in the person of another likeable young man--Harold Brown by name, who will be seen in the spangles of Ohio University. Harold is known on both sides of the river and particularly in the West Virginia sector where he established quite a reputation in the past as a basketball and recreation ball player."

SPORTS by James Young
"...Billy Beckwith, former Ohio university basketball star, brings to this city some interesting information concerning Harold Brown, ex-Big Red athlete who is now burning up the timbers for the Ohio Bobcats.
Bill declares that "Butch" Grover, Ohio coach, regards Brown as one of the finest all-round athletes ever to enter the Ohio school and a brilliant future is forecast for the Parkersburg boy. Grover insists that Brown is easily the best looking sophomore basketball player he has ever seen and with two more years of competition he should scale the heights of the mighty, in the opinion of the Bobcat tutor.
Brown, according to the report, is very likely to be occupying the fullback post for the Ohio gridders this fall as he shows equal promise on the gridiron. During the football season he pulls his weight up to around 175 pounds, is exceptionally fast and packs all the natural ability one could desire.
Quiet, unassuming and a fine all-round boy, Brown's success at Ohio university is proving very gratifying to his hundreds of friends in Parkersburg...."

BOBCAT TINTYPES
Brown Likes His Strawberries
and Prefers Playing Baseball
by Clint McKnight
"Just put him in a strawberry patch until he has eaten his fill, then wander off and let him sleep, and you have made Harold Brown of Parkersburg, W.Va., the happiest man on earth. This six foot halfback likes his strawberries, any way, shape or form, be it ice cream, sundaes, with cream, or just plain strawberries.
At present he is the only three letter man in school, having earned letters in football, basketball, and track.
He prefers baseball to any other sport, and while he has not pursued it in college to any great extent, he would sooner be a big league baseball player than anything else.
As nearly all athletes, he prefers women who indulge in neither smoking or drinking.
Not much interested in airplanes. Says that a roller-coaster ride will suit him.
His pet aversion is being called on in class when he is not prepared. Has not given any thought to Empress Eugenie hats, nor animals.
When a child he was run into by a Ford, and although not seriously hurt he ran home crying. Can eat anything, anytime.
Doesn't care particularly for swimming. Has a pass that will enable him to travel anywhere in the United States, but doesn't want to.
Favorite nickname, "Brownie."
When asked if he preferred summer to winter he answered yes, and that while he has never played regularly golf, he enjoys "goofy-golf."
Snores Much and Often
Admits he snores excessively, and simply can't be awakened.
He has no desire to fish or hunt, because of his entire lack of interest in animals.
Says the hardest and most despicable subject he ever had in college was economics. Is majoring in commerce, and would sooner flit around in old clothes than be a ladies' man.
He weighs 173 stripped, and is twenty years old."

Newspaper Article 1936 ‎(Age 24)‎ Fairmont, Marion County, West Virginia, USA


Hide Details Note: Wedding of Harold and Eloise
HAROLD BROWN, FORMER LOCAL BOY, WEDS GALLIPOLIS GIRL
Mr. Harold Brown, former Big Red athlete and popular local boy, now of Gallipolis, Ohio, took for his bride Miss Martha Eloise Niday in a pretty wedding that occurred in the Methodist Episcopal church at Mason City Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock. The Rev. Mr. Gishler, Presbyterian minister of Gallipolis, performed the impressive ring ceremony before a gathering of relatives and intimate friends.
The bride was attended by Miss Helen McNealey of Gallipolis and Mr. Donald Foglesong of Mason City acted as best man for Mr. Brown. The nuptial music was played by Miss Leah McCuskey, daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Roy McCuskey of Buchanan, formerly of this city.
After the ceremony a beautiful reception was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Foglesong in honor of the bridal pair for seventy-five guests. The Folesong home was also the scene on Thursday morning of another wedding reception following the marriage of their daughter, Miss Evelyn Fogleson and Mr. Ray Proffitt of Point Pleasant which also occurred in the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Harold Brown was an usher at the wedding and Miss Leah McCuskey played the wedding music. Her father, Dr. Roy McCuskey performed the ceremony and Miss Martha McCuskey was a bridesmaid.
Mr. Brown's bride is a daughter of Mrs. Goldie B. Niday of Gallipolis and she was graduated from Gallia academy there. She has been connected with the Wiseman and Wickline Interstate Automobile insurance company for a number of years.
Mr. Brown is the son of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Brown of Fairmont, the family having made their home on Twentieth street in this city for a number of years. while in Parkersburg high school the bridegroom was prominent in track and in football and after his graduation in June 1929 he entered Ohio university at Athens the following fall. There he made a brilliant athletic record in basketball, track and football until he was graduated in 1932.
For the past three years Mr. Brown has taught commerce and has been athletic coach at Gallia academy at Gallipolis. He and his bride will make their home in that city.

Marriage Martha Eloise NIDAY - 29 July 1936 ‎(Age 25)‎ Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA

Wedding Martha Eloise NIDAY - 29 July 1936 ‎(Age 25)‎ Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA


Hide Details Source: Gallipolis Daily Tribune

Citation Details:  30 Jul 1936


Hide Details Note: NIDAY-BROWN NUPTIALS LOVELY AFFAIR
At 8:30 Wednesday evening, July 29, Miss Eloise Niday, daughter of Mrs. E.C. Niday of this city, became the bride of Mr. Harold Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Brown of Fairmont, W. Va.
Rev. L. W. ‎[Lewis Weber]‎ Gishler of First Presbyterian church of Gallipolis read the single ring ceremony in the Methodist Episcopal church at Mason City, W.Va. The church which was beautifully decorated in Queen Anne's lace and mountain laurel with sort white candl lighting, was the scene this morning at 11 o'clock of the marriage of the bridegroom's cousin, Miss Evelyn Foglesong of Mason City to Ray Proffitt of Pt. Pleasant.
Miss Niday and her maid of honor, Miss Helen McNealey of this city, were dressed in summery frocks of chiffon and made pretty pictures as they met the groom and his best man, Donald Foglesong of Mason City, at the altar. Miss Mary Louise Mohr of this city played the nuptial music.
Immediately after the ceremony there was an informal reception at the home of Mr. Brown's uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Foglesong. After a short wedding trip the couple will reside here.
Mrs. Brown is one of the city's fairest and most winsome girls. She graduated from F. A. H. S. in 1933 and has been employed as stenographer with the Wiseman and Wickline Insurance agency. Mr. Brown has made many friends here during his association at the G. A. H. S. as athletic coach. He received his degree at Ohio university and is a member of Delta Tau Delta national social fraternity and of Torch and Blue Key men's honorary fraternities.
Those attending from her in addition to the members of the bridal party were the bride's mother and sister, Mrs. E. C. Niday and Mrs. Frank Robinson, Miss Helen Arthur, Miss Louise Switzer and Miss Susanna Lupton.

‎[Another article with photo of Eloise from the Gallipolis Daily Tribune]‎

Mrs. Harold Brown
Miss Eloise Niday, daughter of Mrs. Goldie Niday, and Mr. Harold Brown, Gallipolis high school athletic coach, were united in marriage last Wednesday. Rev. L. W. Gishler of the Gallipolis Presbyterian church read the service. The bride was honored by many pre-nuptial affairs.

Honeymoon Martha Eloise NIDAY - 30 July 1936 ‎(Age 25)‎

Hide Details Note: Harold and Eloise spent their wedding night at the Lowe Hotel in Point Pleasant, West Virginia. They went back to Mason the next day for the wedding of Harold's first cousin Evelyn Foglesong to Ray Proffitt.

Next Eloise and Harold headed off for the big city of Pittsburgh. ‎(I suppose that they drove their car.)‎ They stayed at the Hotel William Penn for two nights at a cost of $5.25.

Eloise's "colonial bridal bouquet," which included mixed flowers and lots of Queen Anne's Lace, cost $5.15, almost as much as those two nights at the Hotel William Penn in Pittsburgh.

Newspaper Article 25 October 1942 ‎(Age 31)‎ Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA


Source: Gallipolis Daily Tribune


Hide Details Note: Gallipolis Tribune
Principal of GAHS
I don't have the articles, but there is a picture in the paper of a young Principal Harold Brown and Supt. Edwin Higgins. So that must have been when he became principal of the high school for the first time in 1942. He had been at GAHS since 1933. He got his MA degree after he was married in 1936.
‎(Eloise Brown)‎

Biographical Notes 1951 ‎(Age 39)‎ Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA


Hide Details Note: Reunion of class of 1947-51
This is an edited version of Harold's speech to a reunion of the Gallia Academy High School class of 1951.

"Reunions are a lot of fun. I couldn't avoid noticing one apparent thing at all of these reunions. It was always obvious that everyone excepting myself, was getting older. And I notice that all of you are beginning to show signs of wear and tear, but I'm as young as ever.

During the period when you were in GAHS 1947-1951, our school had four good years. We had many good students, many who were leaders, many who did well in music, athletics, and other activities. Although you nice people are now fully grown, mature, successful adults, I still think of you at least to a degree in terms of the teacher-student relationship. You are still my students. And, as you know, teachers have always felt that they should be advisers and counsellors to their students.

I would like to fell that I could say something to you that might help you to enjoy more fully the next 50-60 years. So, permit me to suggest to you, very briefly, three thoughts.
1. Constantly seek knowledge. ‎[He expanded on each point.]‎
2. Be health conscious.
3. Be helpful to others.
Seek knowledge, build good health, help others. I hope that the future is good to you all."

Newspaper Article 16 June 1955 ‎(Age 43)‎ Miamisburg, Montgomery County, Ohio, USA


Source: Miamisburg News


Hide Details Note: The Miamisburg News front page
Principal, Eight New Teachers Hired Here
...M. Harold Brown has been employed as new principal of the Intermediate school, succeeding Richard Howard, who resigned in May after one year as principal and two years of teaching in the Miamisburg system.
Mr. Brown comes to Miamisburg after 22 years At Gallipolis Academy, nine years as teacher and 13 years as principal. He is a graduate of Parkersburg ‎(W. Va.)‎ high school with the class of 1929 and a graduate of Ohio University at Athens. He has his A.B. degree in Commerce and his master's degree in education.
His wife Eloise is a graduate of Gallipolis Academy and has served as a secretary to the superintendent, secretary to the high school principal, and secretary to two insurance firms. She has been active in Grace M.E. church in Gallipolis and in garden and literary clubs. They have a daughter, Martha, who will be a freshman in high school this year.

Occupation 31 August 1961 ‎(Age 50)‎ Gallipolis Medical Center Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA


Hide Details Note: A framed certificate states, "This is to Certify that M. Harold Brown has served as Clinic Manager for a period of 73 months from August 1, 1956 to August 31 1961. During that period of time he performed his duties with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the clinic staff.

In Testimony Whereof, witness the signatures of the undersigned.

Oscar W. Clarke, M.D.
President of Staff

Homer B. Thomas, M.D.
Clinic Manager"

Newspaper Article 15 February 1962 ‎(Age 50)‎ Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA


Source: Gallipolis Daily Tribune


Hide Details Note: Gallipolis Daily Tribune
M.H. BROWN FIRES RECORD SHOT SUNDAY
The first hole-in-one of the 1962 season at the Gallipolis Golf Course was recorded Sunday when M. Harold Brown drove a 160-yard shot into the cup no No. 4 while playing in a threesome.
Brown administrator at the Gallipolis Clinic and former Gallia Academy High School principal, hit his hall-of-fame shot with a six-iron during a match against Dr. H.B. Thomas and Dick Roderick. The ball hit just in front of the green, took one hop, and rolled into the cup on the par-three hole.
Following his fear of marksmanship, Brown turned to one of his companions and asked, "I wonder if I can do it on No. 5 Nobody ever hit two of them back to back have they?" He almost did it too, as he birdied in the par three No. 5.
Brown was one of the approximately 25 golfers who turned out Sunday on the local greenery where all of the greens were frozen and temperatures hovered in the 40's.

Biographical Notes 29 October 1966 ‎(Age 55)‎ Athens, Athens County, Ohio, USA


Source: Athens Messenger


Hide Details Note: Ohio University Athletic Hall of Fame
Harold was in the second group to be inducted. The first group was:
Frank Baumholtz '41
Don Peden '24-'26
Stanley Dougan '14
Russ Finsterwald '19
Dutch Trautwein '38-'49
B. T. Grover '19
C. O Gibson '13
Claude Chrstman '32

In Harold's group of 1966 were the following:
Krum Kahler '08
Mark Hendrickson '19
Hokie Palmer '16
M. Harold Brown '33
Kermit Blosser '32
Dr. Blaine Goldsberry '14

In the Athens Messenger of October 28, 1966 ‎(Friday)‎:
Ohio U. To Induct Six New Hall of Fame Members

Ohio University will induct six new members into its Athletic Hall of Fame Saturday in ceremonies just prior to the kickoff of the Ohio-Dayton Homecoming football game.
To be honored are Dr. George R. "Krum" Kahler, ex-1908 ‎(deceased)‎; Dr. Baline R. Goldsberry, 1913; Horace D. "Hoke" Palmer, ex-1916; m. Harold Brown 1933; and Kermit Blosser, 1933.

About Harold it said, Brown was an All-Buckeye Conference forward in basketball during his playing career at Ohio and at one time held the school marks in both the shotput and discus track events. He was a hero in one of Ohio's all-time great football victories, a 14-0 decision over Navy in 1932. He has been a coach, teacher and administrator in Ohio public schools since 1933 and is presently Superintendent of Schools in Miamisburg, O.

Athens Messenger, Wed. April 19. 1967, page 21:

GW's To Honor Former Coaches
A pair of former Gallipolis High School coaches, one a native of Mason, W. Va., will be honored by the Green and White Club of Athens at its seventh annual sports recognition banquet at Baker Center Thursday.
Speaker for the affair, at which 12 persons, two posthumously, will be honored, is Adolph Rupp, cage coach at the University of Kentucky, Jimmy Crum, sports director of WLW-C television, Columbus will be master of ceremonies.
Among those being honored will be Harold Brown, a native of Mason, W. Va., currently superintendent of schools at Miamisburg, Ohio, and James Halderman, now in a supervisory capacity in the Shaker Heights, Ohio, school system.
Brown attended Parkersburg W. Va., High School and Ohio University, earning a total of eight letters in three sports, basketball, football and track at Ohio U., plus a master's degree.
He was an all-Buckeye Conference forward in basketball and played on conference championship teams in all three sports. One of his most memorable moments was when he was awarded the game ball after Ohio's football victory over Navy in 1932.
Brown spent 22 years at Gallipolis High School, including four as head basketball coach and 13 as principal. For six years he was clinic manager at the Gallipolis clinic.
He has now been with the Miamisburg schools for six years, four as superintendent.
Brown was elected to Ohio University's athletic Hall of Fame in 1966.

This is something else!!
The Green and White Club Recognition Banquet was on April 20, 1967 at the Baker Center, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Harold was one of the honorees. The biographical blurb on the back of the program said this about M. Harold Brown:

This native West Virginian possesses the distinction of being an illustrious alumnus of Ohio University and attaining greatness while participating in collegiate sports. Presently, Superintendent with the Miamisburg schools. He excelled in football, basketball and track, earned 8 Varsty letters, and played on 4 Buckeye Conference Championship teams. ‎(Football, basketball and track)‎. In 1931 and 1933 he was an All-Buckeye Conference forward in basketball. After Ohio University's football victory over Navy in 1932 he was awarded the game ball. In 1966 he was elected to Ohio University's Hall of Fame.

Harold's speech at the induction:

Ladies and gentlemen:
I remember my years of participation in OU athletics with an assortment of feelings and thoughts.
The predominant feeling is related to my good fortune. I was very fortunate in several ways:
a. To go to college. To go to OU.
b. To play in a good, tough league which the Buckeye Conference was.
c. To be A.U. when many good athletes were there.
d. To work under the guidance, teaching and influence of such outstanding men as Don Peden, Butch Grover, Bill Herbert, Dutch Trautwein and others.
e. To participate in purposeful, well-organized and successful operations such as occurred in those years.
f. To have men of the calibre of Dr. Blaine Goldsberry and Thor Olsen to help me to be in good physical condition week after week.

Those were great years. I am happy to have been here at that time.

Needless to say, I am extremely proud to be elected to O.U.'s Hall of Fame.

Newspaper Article 21 June 1967 ‎(Age 55)‎ Miamisburg, Montgomery County, Ohio, USA


Source: Miamisburg News


Hide Details Note: The Miamisburg News
M. HAROLD BROWN RESIGNS TO ACCEPT TWO YEAR ASSIGNMENT IN VIETNAM
by Mady Ransdell
M. Harold Brown, Miamisburg School Superintendent, will resign effective June 30 in order to accept a two year assignment with the Ohio University education project in Vietnam.
Superintendent here for the past four years, Brown will serve as general education advisor assigned to the development of ten new comprehensive secondary schools to be located throughout Vietnam. He will be based in Saigon and is slated to begin his assignment in early July.

Ohio University has conducted education assistance programs in Vietnam under contract with the U.S. Agency for International Development since 1962 and has helped develop demonstration high schools in connection with teacher education programs at the universities of Hue, Saigon and Can Tho.
Brown said that the ten principals who will serve the new schools have been studying and traveling to observe in the United States along with several members of the Education Ministry of Vietnam. The project will involve the remodeling of some buildings and "starting from scratch' in the case of others.

The educator will be located in the office of Don Knox, Chief of Party, Ohio University, Contract, 97 Hong Thap Thu, Saigon.
Mrs. Brown and their daughter Martha will join Brown in September in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, said to be "safe haven" for dependents of Ohio University technicians stationed in Vietnam. The family will be able to be together every month or six week. Kuala Lumpur is a city of British influence, about the size of Dayton.

A graduate of Ohio University, Brown holds a Bachelor of Arts degree and Master of Education. From 1933 to 1942 he was a commercial teacher at Gallia Academy High School in Gallipolis, Ohio and was named principal there in 1942, a position he held until 1955. In that year he accepted the position of principal of the Intermediate School. He returned to Gallipolis and was business manager of the Gallipolis Clinic for six years. In 1962 Brown was named assistant superintendent of the Miamisburg School System and in 1963, became superintendent following Frank Young in that position.

Last fall, Brown was honored by Ohio University when he was named to the Athletic Hall of Fame of the University. He holds eight varsity letters from 1929 to 1933--three in basketball, three in track and two in football. He was elected to the All Buckeye Conference and is credited with a first in shot put and discus at the Conference.

In addition, he earned two titles in track and is acclaimed as the hero of a 14-0 football victory over Navy during his college career.
He is also a member of the Green and White.

Biographical Notes circa 1970 ‎(Age 58)‎

Hide Details Note: Roast 'n Toast - quips from Don Foglesong
Greetings from your first grade teacher, Miss Lena Gibbs. She couldn't come but wanted me to tell you how proud she has always been of you.

Harold has always been a great conservationist. He conserved his money, and he conserved his energy. ‎(Don would have given humorous examples of these traits.)‎

Harold was great in many sports, football, basketball, track; but he never played his best sport--baseball. He would have become a major leaguer for sure.

This is but a hint of Don's highly entertaining speech.

I have known Harold longer than anyone except a previous speaker his sister, ‎(Evelyn Foglesong Proffitt)‎. The only reason for that is that she is older than I.

Roast 'n Toast - Harold's Response
I found a paper from The Procter & Gamble Company, October 11, 1977, on which Harold sketchily wrote some notes for a response to his roast & toast at the Shrine Club.

"Your kind remarks are good for my ego. If I ever go to trial, I would like to have some of you people on the jury. When judgment day comes, I'd like to engage some of you to speak to St. Peter on my behalf.

To receive recognition has tremendous effect on some people. Such as on me! Now, I'll have to try to do better for the rest of my life than I really planned to do.

My favorite girlfriend--Eloise Niday Brown. She really looks after me, babies me, is very good to me. Each of us is very fond of the other. Over the 41+ years that we have been married, she has made it a point to be critical when she felt it was necessary. The trouble is--she has thought criticism was necessary so often.

During my working years as teacher, high school principal, middle school principal, clinic manager, assistant superintendent of schools, superintendent, work with Ohio University, the State Department of Education and Gallipolis city manager, I think that the toughest but most satisfying work was that of high school principal. I felt that perhaps one of my worthwhile efforts was in the area of counselling boys about their problems, goals, relationships, and the years ahead.

I am not as good as some of you say I am; and I'm not as bad as some of you think I am.

In December a visitor came into my office, a man of about 55 years. He said, "The dignity you had, the respect you earned, the way you dealt with me, caused me to want to model myself after you." I was on cloud nine--thanks!

Now for being so good to me this evening and over the years, thank you very much. I am very grateful."

Roast 'n Toast - Two Women
"I would like to mention two women who had a great influence on my early years, my mother Willie Ruttencutter Brown and her sister Martha Katharine Ruttencutter Foglesong--Katie. There were five of us children ‎[Harold and Max Brown and Evelyn, Don & Sam Foglesong]‎. Our mothers always seemed to have us under control, to know where we were and what we were doing.

They had a puritan approach: no card playing excepting Rook and Old Maid and no drinking except water and milk ‎(carbonated drinks might lead to something worse)‎. As a result, I did not smoke or drink until the age of 22. While in college I learned to play cards and now love to play bridge.

As a boy growing up and going to school back in the 1920s, our family was not economically well off; but I didn't feel deprived. I did have considerable doubt about going to college, even though I took a college preparatory course. I was extremely pleased, therefore, to be invited to O.U. on an athletic scholarship of a sort which enabled me to earn board and room. The tuition fees were $40 a semester." ‎[What Harold didn't mention was that he supplemented his income by becoming a very good poker player!]‎

Biographical Notes 10 December 1978 ‎(Age 67)‎

Hide Details Note: Martha interviewed Harold
In Harold's pre-school years his parents lived in several places because of Miles' work with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. They lived in Wheeling, McMechen, and near Kaiser, West Virginia and Baltimore, Maryland.

Harold went to first grade in Mason, West Virginia. It was the time of World War I, and Miles had a government job in Nitro, West Virginia. I'm sure that Willie enjoyed being near her relatives in Mason City. Harold was about in third grade when the family moved back to Parkersburg. Miles was with the B&O. They lived in several different houses, all rented: Teft Street, 2410 Lyn Street, 1805 20th Street ‎(lived there longest--from 5th grade until university)‎, 19th St. and 22nd St.

In Parkersburg Harold attended Jefferson Elementary School. He later went to McKinley School where he finished 6th grade. Grades 7 to 8 were in downtown Parkersburg, so Harold either rode his bicycle or took a streetcar. He attended high school at Parkersburg High, which he really enjoyed. In his neighborhood there was a group of boys interested in sports. They played as a team and had competitions. Harold said he learned at an early age to play well and hard and to win.

Harold finished high school in 1929 and went to work as a laborer for the B&O railroad in the same general area where his dad Miles was a car foreman. He hoped to be able to go to college, but was uncertain about how to pay for it. I'm not sure how it happened, but Harold received an athletics scholarship which would pay for his school fees.

Harold went to Athens to work his way through college, which he did by working at various jobs and by playing poker. Butch Grover, his OU coach, encouraged Harold, and Harold didn't let him down. Harold's athletics schedule included football, basketball, and track events ‎(100 M dash & hurdles, javelin, discus)‎.
Harold did have a social life because he pledged Delta Tau Delta and lived in the house.

When Harold graduated from OU, he was offered a job as a teacher and coach at Gallia Academy High School in Gallipolis, Ohio, which he accepted. For nine years from 1933 to 1942 he taught there. He earned between $1120 to 1800. He decided to become a high school principal because a principal earned more money and could expect better pay increases. It was another challenge for better money. He did a Masters degree in Education to qualify for principal. His largest salary as principal was $4,800 a year.

By 1936 Harold had married Eloise Niday and in 1941 they had a daughter, Martha Katharine Brown, "the sweetest girl in town," Harold used to say.

In 1955 the Browns moved to Miamisburg, Ohio, near Dayton where Harold earned $5,800 as an intermediate school principal. In 1956 they returned to Gallipolis where Harold was manager of the Gallipolis Medical Clinic at the startling salary of $7,500. In 1962 he returned to Miamisburg to become assistant superintendent of schools. The next year when Mr. Young retired, he became superintendent.

In 1966 Harold was inducted into the Ohio University Hall of Fame in recognition for his outstanding athletic achievements.

In 1967 Harold was phoned by Gil Stephenson from Ohio University to ask if he would consider joining an OU team of educators who would work for USAID in Vietnam. He said he would.

From 1967 until 1970 Harold worked in Vietnam, often under trying circumstances. He was most fortunate to have been in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with Eloise during the Tet offensive of 1968. Eloise lived with the other wives in Kuala Lumpur because Vietnam was not safe for families.

In 1970 the Ohio State Department of Education invited Harold to be an adviser, a specialist in secondary education. He was asked to evaluate schools. He did that for one year and then retired. He was very ready for retirement, having worked so long and so hard for what seemed so little! By this time Harold and Eloise were again living in Gallipolis among their old friends and relatives.

During 1973 and 1977 Harold as asked if he would be interim manager of the city of Galliipolis. Gallipolis was in a bad financial condition. Harold did a good job.

The Browns spent their winters in Fort Myers, Florida, where they enjoyed playing golf and bridge and socializing with their friends. Harold discovered lapidary and polished stones to make jewellery. Martha sent him some opal from Australia. They moved to Fort Myers permanently in 1979 when Harold was diagnosed with a serious disease, periarteritis nodosa. The weather was better for him, and the medical facilities were good.

In the meantime Harold's daughter Martha had married David Shepherd and lived in Adelaide, South Australia. Harold and Eloise's two granddaughters, Katharine ‎(1970)‎ and Sarah ‎(1973)‎ lived down-under. Harold and Eloise made many trips to Australia, even when Harold was ill and had to have kidney dialysis in Adelaide. Martha and the children also visited Harold and Eloise in Ohio and Florida. They saw a lot of each other considering how far apart they lived.

Harold died, aged 72, on 11 November 1983 in Fort Myers, Florida. Eloise and Martha took his ashes back to Point Pleasant, West Virginia, for burial next to his beloved parents, brother ‎(Max)‎ and nephew ‎(David Harold)‎.

Letters 24 July 1982 ‎(Age 71)‎ Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, USA


Hide Details Note: from Harold W. Piggott Sr
Harold W. Piggott Sr.
504 Ruxton Drive
Wilmington, Del. 19809
Phone: 746-7560
7-24-82
Dear Harold,
I believe it has been 53 years since I have seen you, but I have thought of you often.
Paul Matheny showed me your letter to him, so I'm writing you to express my good wishes for you and yours.
Your P.H.S. class of '29 was a wonderful class and I think you have honored them in your life. One week ago, July 17, 8 of my P.H.S. class of 1912 got together for our 70th Reunion! How about that?
One week ago, July 17, the members of the State Champion P.H.S. football team of 1927 had their 55th Reunion. There were 18 present and I was privileged to be there in spite of the fact that I'll be 90 on Sept. 11. We had a wonderful time.
In memory of a fine school, of your fine class of 29 and of your contribution, I salute you.
May God bless you
Sincerely,
H.W. Piggott

Newspaper Article Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, USA


Hide Details Note: The Sport Beacon ‎(feature)‎
Adequate proof that one cannot judge the ability of an athlete by his appearance is provided in the story of a Parkersburg high school lad who had little more than fair success with Big Red teams--then went to Ohio University and became one of the Bobcats' most valued all-round athletes.

The lad of whom we speak was Harold Brown, who was in several of our classes in P.H.S. ‎[Parkersburg High School]‎ quiet, reserved and unusually studious. Harold hardly could have been regarded as the type that was destined to become a star on college basketball, football and track teams. Yet, during his four years at the Athens institution, he developed into one of the greatest stars ever to have graduated from P.H.S.

Many of the high school boys regarded Brown as more or less of a teachers' pet'--much too studious to join the ranks of the immortals of track and gridiron fame. But those teachers' pets deserve more than a passing glance, for they usually have the intelligence to learn quickly intricate plays and form required of a successful athlete. One can also find in them the persistence to strive until they have developed their maximum capabilities.

That same Harold Brown captured the Buckeye Conference shot put record, but he learned before he was graduated that no matter how good you are, you're apt to run into a fellow who is better.

One afternoon during spring track and field practice Harold was tossing the shot put near his conference record for the 16-ounce ball and a young freshman in street attire was among those looking on.

"Let me try that thing once," he asked. Brown gave him the heavy metal sphere.
The young freshman stripped off his coat and outdid Brown's best efforts. The freshman possessed practically no form, but made his shot puts solely with the strength of his arm. Needless to say, the coach did not lose any time in obtaining the freshman's name and signing him for the team. His name was Paul Halleck, a name that may represent America's hopes in that event in the Olympics this year. During his college career, Halleck has been defeated in the toss but once ‎(one inch)‎ his conqueror being Don Elser, Notre Dame's ace.

Death 11 November 1983 ‎(Age 72)‎ Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida, USA

Cause of death: Kidney failure; periarteritis nodosa
Letters 1983 ‎(Age 71)‎ Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA


Hide Details Note: Sympathy card from Vivian Wood
Dear Eloise & Martha:
Harold was such a good man and helped so many young lives to a better Life here on Earth. He was quiet and sincere in all his dealings with Youth. Be thankful you had so many happy years. He strengthened all our faith in the plans of our Master. We shall miss him but think of his great influence here on Earth with our Young.
God give you His richest blessings.
Love, Vivian

Newspaper Article 1983 ‎(Age 71)‎ Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida, USA


Hide Details Note: Seven Lakes Newspaper
Know your neighbor
Malaysia a "safe haven" for Browns, and an exciting one
by Mel Powers
Seven Lakes staff
Gallipolis ‎(pronounced galley-police)‎ Ohio is the hometown of Eloise and Harold Brown. One of the oldest towns in Ohio, it was settled by a group of French people in 1790 and its name denotes "city of the Gauls."
During his long career in education, Harold was first a teacher, then a high school principal and later superintendent of schools. Eloise divulged that in 1930 while attending Ohio University Harold did most of the passing and kicking in a football game against Navy. Ohio won 14-0 and the newspaper headlines proclaimed "Brown Beats Navy." An outstanding athlete in football, basketball and track, Harold Brown was inducted into the Ohio University Hall of Fame.
From 1967-70 Harold was among a team of 16 people from Ohio University sent to Vietnam under a contract between the University and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Their services were related to developing secondary education and a teacher training program at the university level.
while Eloise and their daughter Martha could not accompany him on this assignment, it was necessary for them to live in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, a "safe haven" for families of men working inVietnam. They found it an exciting experience to live among the three distinct cultures of the Original Malaysians, the Chinese and the Indians, each of whom had their own food and special festivities.
Since their daughter married a native Australian and lives in Adelaide, the Browns library contains many books about that continent and they have visited Australia several times. They reside in building 2, apartment 208.

Harold Brown died November 11, 1983. When we met last Spring he graciously agreed to talk of his past experiences. It was a privilege to have known, though briefly, this very special man.

Burial Suncrest Cemetery, Mason County, West Virginia, USA

Last Change 21 March 2008 - 15:17:51 - by: Administrator
View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F5)
Miles Oscar BROWN
1881 - 1957
Willie Frances RUTTENCUTTER
1889 - 1978
Miles Harold BROWN
1911 - 1983
Max David BROWN
1916 - 1975

Immediate Family  (F2)
Martha Eloise NIDAY
1915 - 2002
Martha Katharine BROWN
1941 - 2014


Notes
Birth Willie came home to Mason to have her first baby at the home of her parents. Her sister Katie Foglesong was there, too. Sadly, their mother had recently died. Miles Harold Brown was born on a summer's day in July at the Ruttencutter family home.
Biographical Notes by his teacher Lena L. Gibbs
For reading Harold started at 95, then 97, then 99 thereafter. For writing, he got a 90, then 93, 94, 95, then stayed at 97. For numbers, later to be his best subject, he started with 90, 93, 95 then 99 from then on. He had four large gold stars on his card. He consistently got 100 for deportment, and he didn't miss a day of school.
Biographical Notes Camping
Harold used to go camping with his cousin Donald Foglesong and their fathers, Miles Brown and Will Foglesong. Perhaps younger brothers, Max Brown and Sam Foglesong, the "babies," also got to go along. The mothers, Willie Brown and her sister Katie Foglesong made the tent. They used to put up the tent by a stream, then dig a hole by the steam where it would be cool--their refrigerator. They always went fishing and caught catfish which they cooked and ate by the campfire.
Newspaper Article Athens Messenger Sports
When the football season of 1931 rolled around Don Peden foresaw that he was going to be short-handed in the matter of tailbacks for Rush Kepler was the only man available for the position. Something had to be done to guard against a gaping hole in this position in the event Kepler was injured. Moreover, looking a full year ahead, Don realized that when Kepler graduated he wouldn't have a kicker and passer for the '32 season unless something was done along the line of developing one immediately. Casting around for a likely prospect, a third-string fullback, one Harold Brown by name, was elected as Kepler's understudy. Brown had never done any kicking and what passing he had done was confined almost entirely to simply tossing the ball around the two or three other teammates in practice. But the keen Peden eye saw possibilities that were not apparent to the casual observer, even to a more diligent onlooker.

From that time on Brown's practice sessions were devoted to long drills in passing and kicking with Kepler, as well as the coaches, devoting considerable time to teaching his understudy. Brownie learned quickly. He progressed rapidly through that season and when practice started for 1932 he was far enough along to dispel any fears Peden might have had about the loss of Kepler being irreparable. Brownie's performance at Indiana left no doubt as to his being capable of handling the job. One of Brown's biggest attributes was his coolness under fire. He refused to let anything worry him. Seldom, if ever, did he appear to be hurried in getting away a kick or a pass, even though there may have been times when he actually was rushed plenty.

Then, the in Navy game, came Brown's crowning performance. Navy had a highly-publicized halfback from Hawaii by name, Gordon Chung-Hoon. Eastern newspaper scribes came to the Ohio-Navy game to watch Chung-Hoon. But they wrote about Harold Brown. He was the outstanding player on the field that day. He threw a long pass to Elden Armbrust that paved the way for Ohio's first touchdown, and he tossed another to Joe Sintic for the second touchdown.
That touchdown pass to Sintic, Don Peden says, was the most deliberate play he has seen in his 12 years at Ohio. And anyone who witnessed the play will not hesitate to agree that it was deliberate to say the least. As called, the pass was supposed to go to George Collins, Ohio's right end. But the Bobcats were deep in a Navy territory and the Middies, sensing what was coming, managed to lock Collins up so that he could not get down to take the toss. Hence, when Brown, after faking a try at the line, faded back and looked towards the goal, he saw no receiver. For what seemed ages to us in the stands--and also to those on the bench, Peden admits--Brown trotted around behind the line of scrimmage, leisurely dodging would-be tacklers with a nonchalance that was amazing. How long he did this, actually, probably no one knows. But finally he saw Sintic across the goal line, flipped the ball to him and Ohio had its second touchdown.
‎(related by Don Peden to G. E. Mitchell)‎
Newspaper Article The Herald Dispatch
page 7:
For your approval, we offer this morning the first annual All-Buckeye basketball selections of The Herald-Dispatch. The men named on the first and second squads represent the ultimate in Buckeye Conference society not only in the mind of the writer, who has seen each player perform numerous times, but also in the opinions of coaches, officials and newspapermen throughout the league.
Captain Ramey hunter, Marshall's great athlete, is moved from his regular center position to a forward where he pairs with Harold Brown of Ohio University on the first team. The season just closing marking Marshall's entrance into the league, Hunter thus becomes the first wearer of the Green and White to be honored with an All-Buckeye berth.

BROWN--Handicapped by illness in early season, but he came through in every important game. Best ball handler on Ohio's championship squad. Controls ball good portion of every game and rarely makes bad pass. Plays in pivot well and is best shot in league swinging from the pivot. Was best of loop's forwards. One of two West Virginia boys on team, Hunter being other. Graduates this June.
Newspaper Article Max Brown's clippings
Max Brown kept an athletic scrapbook which featured his older brother Harold. The following are some of the exerpts which mention Big Reds ‎[Parkersburgh High School]‎ or the Bobcats ‎[Ohio University]‎, some of which are not dated or identified by newspaper:

OHIO U. STAR
‎[Photograph of Harold holding basketball - Harold Brown Center]‎
The following exerpts are quoted from the Athens Messenger under date of Feb. 11, 1932, and were written by Grover Mitchell, sports editor of the Athens Messenger. You may perhaps be interested in them.
"Harold Brown, Ohio's stellar all-round athlete, playing perhaps the greatest game of his career, stood head and shoulders above everyone else on the floor last night. But even his Herculean efforts to win the ball game single-handed went for naught.
It was Brownie who kept the Bobcats in the ball game all the way. He sent two field goals through the hoop in the first half and then really got going in the second stanze to count five times from the floor and four times from the free line. His total for the night was 18 points, more than half of the Bobcats' total."
"Harold Brown threatens to uphold the prestige of Parkersburg athletes in the collegiate world with his brilliant play at center for the Ohio University basketball team.
The big boy looked to be the best man on the floor during the Ohio Wesleyan game this week and his 18 points were more than half the number the entire Ohio team was able to score against the Methodists.
Brown is cool as an ice cake during the most heated minutes of the battle and he failed to blow a single good opportunity to score. His defensive work was above par and if coach Grover was favored with five athletes whose abilities equalled those of Brown there is little doubt as to who the conference champions would be this season."

OHIO U. TEAM OFF FOR NAVY
Harold Brown of Parkersburg Is Among Bobcats Heading Eastward
Athens, Ohio, Oct. 14.--Ohio University's football machine started toward Annapolis Thursday night with full steam registered for the battle with navy Saturday.
New aerial plays issued this week have been working successfully and Peden expects to use more passes than have been used in all of the games this year. Harold Brown, leading ball tosser, has shown improvement this week in his throwing. He has been passing the ball with more accuracy and more force."

LOCAL BOYS TO MEET IN GAME
Harold Brown and Harlan Baumberger Will Oppose Each Other
"Parkersburg will be well represented in the Ohio University-Navy game tomorrow as two former Big Red players will be opposing each other. Harold Brown is expected to play a prominent part in the Bobcat offense as a halfback while Harlan Baumberger probably will see service at a halfback post for the Middies.
Baumberger has participated in all of the Navy games this year, being frequently substituted for Chung-Hoon, the Navy's famous ball carrier."

NAVY BEATEN, 14-0 BY OHIO'S PASSES
continued from Page 1.
Both teams wages a bitter battle in the line, and if anything the Tars held a shade advantage in general defensive play from this angle, but the accurate and varied passing emulated by Harold Brown, veteran back of the aggregation from Athens, held the Naval lads in a maze of bewilderment throughout. His passes proved the main factor in Navy's undoing, one putting the ball in position to score the first touchdown and another, splendidly executed, was directly responsible for the other.
Brown, playing tail back in the Warner system as employed by the Bobcats, was the bright particular star of the game. Not only was he a deadly passer, but he punted in splendid fashion and was a bear in the secondary defense."

MANY LOCAL FANS TO SEE GAME AT OHIO UNIVERSITY
To Journey To Athens Wednesday To See Marietts
PLAY BOB CATS
Jimmy Clark and Harold Brown to Be In Line-Up
"Many local basketball enthusiasts are making plans already to be in Athens Wednesday evening in order to see Marietta clash with the bob-Cats on the Ohio University hard wood court.
In addition to this, there is the second reason in the person of another likeable young man--Harold Brown by name, who will be seen in the spangles of Ohio University. Harold is known on both sides of the river and particularly in the West Virginia sector where he established quite a reputation in the past as a basketball and recreation ball player."

SPORTS by James Young
"...Billy Beckwith, former Ohio university basketball star, brings to this city some interesting information concerning Harold Brown, ex-Big Red athlete who is now burning up the timbers for the Ohio Bobcats.
Bill declares that "Butch" Grover, Ohio coach, regards Brown as one of the finest all-round athletes ever to enter the Ohio school and a brilliant future is forecast for the Parkersburg boy. Grover insists that Brown is easily the best looking sophomore basketball player he has ever seen and with two more years of competition he should scale the heights of the mighty, in the opinion of the Bobcat tutor.
Brown, according to the report, is very likely to be occupying the fullback post for the Ohio gridders this fall as he shows equal promise on the gridiron. During the football season he pulls his weight up to around 175 pounds, is exceptionally fast and packs all the natural ability one could desire.
Quiet, unassuming and a fine all-round boy, Brown's success at Ohio university is proving very gratifying to his hundreds of friends in Parkersburg...."

BOBCAT TINTYPES
Brown Likes His Strawberries
and Prefers Playing Baseball
by Clint McKnight
"Just put him in a strawberry patch until he has eaten his fill, then wander off and let him sleep, and you have made Harold Brown of Parkersburg, W.Va., the happiest man on earth. This six foot halfback likes his strawberries, any way, shape or form, be it ice cream, sundaes, with cream, or just plain strawberries.
At present he is the only three letter man in school, having earned letters in football, basketball, and track.
He prefers baseball to any other sport, and while he has not pursued it in college to any great extent, he would sooner be a big league baseball player than anything else.
As nearly all athletes, he prefers women who indulge in neither smoking or drinking.
Not much interested in airplanes. Says that a roller-coaster ride will suit him.
His pet aversion is being called on in class when he is not prepared. Has not given any thought to Empress Eugenie hats, nor animals.
When a child he was run into by a Ford, and although not seriously hurt he ran home crying. Can eat anything, anytime.
Doesn't care particularly for swimming. Has a pass that will enable him to travel anywhere in the United States, but doesn't want to.
Favorite nickname, "Brownie."
When asked if he preferred summer to winter he answered yes, and that while he has never played regularly golf, he enjoys "goofy-golf."
Snores Much and Often
Admits he snores excessively, and simply can't be awakened.
He has no desire to fish or hunt, because of his entire lack of interest in animals.
Says the hardest and most despicable subject he ever had in college was economics. Is majoring in commerce, and would sooner flit around in old clothes than be a ladies' man.
He weighs 173 stripped, and is twenty years old."
Newspaper Article Wedding of Harold and Eloise
HAROLD BROWN, FORMER LOCAL BOY, WEDS GALLIPOLIS GIRL
Mr. Harold Brown, former Big Red athlete and popular local boy, now of Gallipolis, Ohio, took for his bride Miss Martha Eloise Niday in a pretty wedding that occurred in the Methodist Episcopal church at Mason City Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock. The Rev. Mr. Gishler, Presbyterian minister of Gallipolis, performed the impressive ring ceremony before a gathering of relatives and intimate friends.
The bride was attended by Miss Helen McNealey of Gallipolis and Mr. Donald Foglesong of Mason City acted as best man for Mr. Brown. The nuptial music was played by Miss Leah McCuskey, daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Roy McCuskey of Buchanan, formerly of this city.
After the ceremony a beautiful reception was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Foglesong in honor of the bridal pair for seventy-five guests. The Folesong home was also the scene on Thursday morning of another wedding reception following the marriage of their daughter, Miss Evelyn Fogleson and Mr. Ray Proffitt of Point Pleasant which also occurred in the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Harold Brown was an usher at the wedding and Miss Leah McCuskey played the wedding music. Her father, Dr. Roy McCuskey performed the ceremony and Miss Martha McCuskey was a bridesmaid.
Mr. Brown's bride is a daughter of Mrs. Goldie B. Niday of Gallipolis and she was graduated from Gallia academy there. She has been connected with the Wiseman and Wickline Interstate Automobile insurance company for a number of years.
Mr. Brown is the son of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Brown of Fairmont, the family having made their home on Twentieth street in this city for a number of years. while in Parkersburg high school the bridegroom was prominent in track and in football and after his graduation in June 1929 he entered Ohio university at Athens the following fall. There he made a brilliant athletic record in basketball, track and football until he was graduated in 1932.
For the past three years Mr. Brown has taught commerce and has been athletic coach at Gallia academy at Gallipolis. He and his bride will make their home in that city.
Wedding NIDAY-BROWN NUPTIALS LOVELY AFFAIR
At 8:30 Wednesday evening, July 29, Miss Eloise Niday, daughter of Mrs. E.C. Niday of this city, became the bride of Mr. Harold Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Brown of Fairmont, W. Va.
Rev. L. W. ‎[Lewis Weber]‎ Gishler of First Presbyterian church of Gallipolis read the single ring ceremony in the Methodist Episcopal church at Mason City, W.Va. The church which was beautifully decorated in Queen Anne's lace and mountain laurel with sort white candl lighting, was the scene this morning at 11 o'clock of the marriage of the bridegroom's cousin, Miss Evelyn Foglesong of Mason City to Ray Proffitt of Pt. Pleasant.
Miss Niday and her maid of honor, Miss Helen McNealey of this city, were dressed in summery frocks of chiffon and made pretty pictures as they met the groom and his best man, Donald Foglesong of Mason City, at the altar. Miss Mary Louise Mohr of this city played the nuptial music.
Immediately after the ceremony there was an informal reception at the home of Mr. Brown's uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Foglesong. After a short wedding trip the couple will reside here.
Mrs. Brown is one of the city's fairest and most winsome girls. She graduated from F. A. H. S. in 1933 and has been employed as stenographer with the Wiseman and Wickline Insurance agency. Mr. Brown has made many friends here during his association at the G. A. H. S. as athletic coach. He received his degree at Ohio university and is a member of Delta Tau Delta national social fraternity and of Torch and Blue Key men's honorary fraternities.
Those attending from her in addition to the members of the bridal party were the bride's mother and sister, Mrs. E. C. Niday and Mrs. Frank Robinson, Miss Helen Arthur, Miss Louise Switzer and Miss Susanna Lupton.

‎[Another article with photo of Eloise from the Gallipolis Daily Tribune]‎

Mrs. Harold Brown
Miss Eloise Niday, daughter of Mrs. Goldie Niday, and Mr. Harold Brown, Gallipolis high school athletic coach, were united in marriage last Wednesday. Rev. L. W. Gishler of the Gallipolis Presbyterian church read the service. The bride was honored by many pre-nuptial affairs.
Wedding NIDAY-BROWN NUPTIALS LOVELY AFFAIR
At 8:30 Wednesday evening, July 29, Miss Eloise Niday, daughter of Mrs. E.C. Niday of this city, became the bride of Mr. Harold Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Brown of Fairmont, W. Va.
Rev. L. W. ‎[Lewis Weber]‎ Gishler of First Presbyterian church of Gallipolis read the single ring ceremony in the Methodist Episcopal church at Mason City, W.Va. The church which was beautifully decorated in Queen Anne's lace and mountain laurel with sort white candl lighting, was the scene this morning at 11 o'clock of the marriage of the bridegroom's cousin, Miss Evelyn Foglesong of Mason City to Ray Proffitt of Pt. Pleasant.
Miss Niday and her maid of honor, Miss Helen McNealey of this city, were dressed in summery frocks of chiffon and made pretty pictures as they met the groom and his best man, Donald Foglesong of Mason City, at the altar. Miss Mary Louise Mohr of this city played the nuptial music.
Immediately after the ceremony there was an informal reception at the home of Mr. Brown's uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Foglesong. After a short wedding trip the couple will reside here.
Mrs. Brown is one of the city's fairest and most winsome girls. She graduated from F. A. H. S. in 1933 and has been employed as stenographer with the Wiseman and Wickline Insurance agency. Mr. Brown has made many friends here during his association at the G. A. H. S. as athletic coach. He received his degree at Ohio university and is a member of Delta Tau Delta national social fraternity and of Torch and Blue Key men's honorary fraternities.
Those attending from her in addition to the members of the bridal party were the bride's mother and sister, Mrs. E. C. Niday and Mrs. Frank Robinson, Miss Helen Arthur, Miss Louise Switzer and Miss Susanna Lupton.

‎[Another article with photo of Eloise from the Gallipolis Daily Tribune]‎

Mrs. Harold Brown
Miss Eloise Niday, daughter of Mrs. Goldie Niday, and Mr. Harold Brown, Gallipolis high school athletic coach, were united in marriage last Wednesday. Rev. L. W. Gishler of the Gallipolis Presbyterian church read the service. The bride was honored by many pre-nuptial affairs.
Honeymoon Harold and Eloise spent their wedding night at the Lowe Hotel in Point Pleasant, West Virginia. They went back to Mason the next day for the wedding of Harold's first cousin Evelyn Foglesong to Ray Proffitt.

Next Eloise and Harold headed off for the big city of Pittsburgh. ‎(I suppose that they drove their car.)‎ They stayed at the Hotel William Penn for two nights at a cost of $5.25.

Eloise's "colonial bridal bouquet," which included mixed flowers and lots of Queen Anne's Lace, cost $5.15, almost as much as those two nights at the Hotel William Penn in Pittsburgh.
Honeymoon Harold and Eloise spent their wedding night at the Lowe Hotel in Point Pleasant, West Virginia. They went back to Mason the next day for the wedding of Harold's first cousin Evelyn Foglesong to Ray Proffitt.

Next Eloise and Harold headed off for the big city of Pittsburgh. ‎(I suppose that they drove their car.)‎ They stayed at the Hotel William Penn for two nights at a cost of $5.25.

Eloise's "colonial bridal bouquet," which included mixed flowers and lots of Queen Anne's Lace, cost $5.15, almost as much as those two nights at the Hotel William Penn in Pittsburgh.
Newspaper Article Gallipolis Tribune
Principal of GAHS
I don't have the articles, but there is a picture in the paper of a young Principal Harold Brown and Supt. Edwin Higgins. So that must have been when he became principal of the high school for the first time in 1942. He had been at GAHS since 1933. He got his MA degree after he was married in 1936.
‎(Eloise Brown)‎
Biographical Notes Reunion of class of 1947-51
This is an edited version of Harold's speech to a reunion of the Gallia Academy High School class of 1951.

"Reunions are a lot of fun. I couldn't avoid noticing one apparent thing at all of these reunions. It was always obvious that everyone excepting myself, was getting older. And I notice that all of you are beginning to show signs of wear and tear, but I'm as young as ever.

During the period when you were in GAHS 1947-1951, our school had four good years. We had many good students, many who were leaders, many who did well in music, athletics, and other activities. Although you nice people are now fully grown, mature, successful adults, I still think of you at least to a degree in terms of the teacher-student relationship. You are still my students. And, as you know, teachers have always felt that they should be advisers and counsellors to their students.

I would like to fell that I could say something to you that might help you to enjoy more fully the next 50-60 years. So, permit me to suggest to you, very briefly, three thoughts.
1. Constantly seek knowledge. ‎[He expanded on each point.]‎
2. Be health conscious.
3. Be helpful to others.
Seek knowledge, build good health, help others. I hope that the future is good to you all."
Newspaper Article The Miamisburg News front page
Principal, Eight New Teachers Hired Here
...M. Harold Brown has been employed as new principal of the Intermediate school, succeeding Richard Howard, who resigned in May after one year as principal and two years of teaching in the Miamisburg system.
Mr. Brown comes to Miamisburg after 22 years At Gallipolis Academy, nine years as teacher and 13 years as principal. He is a graduate of Parkersburg ‎(W. Va.)‎ high school with the class of 1929 and a graduate of Ohio University at Athens. He has his A.B. degree in Commerce and his master's degree in education.
His wife Eloise is a graduate of Gallipolis Academy and has served as a secretary to the superintendent, secretary to the high school principal, and secretary to two insurance firms. She has been active in Grace M.E. church in Gallipolis and in garden and literary clubs. They have a daughter, Martha, who will be a freshman in high school this year.
Occupation A framed certificate states, "This is to Certify that M. Harold Brown has served as Clinic Manager for a period of 73 months from August 1, 1956 to August 31 1961. During that period of time he performed his duties with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the clinic staff.

In Testimony Whereof, witness the signatures of the undersigned.

Oscar W. Clarke, M.D.
President of Staff

Homer B. Thomas, M.D.
Clinic Manager"
Newspaper Article Gallipolis Daily Tribune
M.H. BROWN FIRES RECORD SHOT SUNDAY
The first hole-in-one of the 1962 season at the Gallipolis Golf Course was recorded Sunday when M. Harold Brown drove a 160-yard shot into the cup no No. 4 while playing in a threesome.
Brown administrator at the Gallipolis Clinic and former Gallia Academy High School principal, hit his hall-of-fame shot with a six-iron during a match against Dr. H.B. Thomas and Dick Roderick. The ball hit just in front of the green, took one hop, and rolled into the cup on the par-three hole.
Following his fear of marksmanship, Brown turned to one of his companions and asked, "I wonder if I can do it on No. 5 Nobody ever hit two of them back to back have they?" He almost did it too, as he birdied in the par three No. 5.
Brown was one of the approximately 25 golfers who turned out Sunday on the local greenery where all of the greens were frozen and temperatures hovered in the 40's.
Biographical Notes Ohio University Athletic Hall of Fame
Harold was in the second group to be inducted. The first group was:
Frank Baumholtz '41
Don Peden '24-'26
Stanley Dougan '14
Russ Finsterwald '19
Dutch Trautwein '38-'49
B. T. Grover '19
C. O Gibson '13
Claude Chrstman '32

In Harold's group of 1966 were the following:
Krum Kahler '08
Mark Hendrickson '19
Hokie Palmer '16
M. Harold Brown '33
Kermit Blosser '32
Dr. Blaine Goldsberry '14

In the Athens Messenger of October 28, 1966 ‎(Friday)‎:
Ohio U. To Induct Six New Hall of Fame Members

Ohio University will induct six new members into its Athletic Hall of Fame Saturday in ceremonies just prior to the kickoff of the Ohio-Dayton Homecoming football game.
To be honored are Dr. George R. "Krum" Kahler, ex-1908 ‎(deceased)‎; Dr. Baline R. Goldsberry, 1913; Horace D. "Hoke" Palmer, ex-1916; m. Harold Brown 1933; and Kermit Blosser, 1933.

About Harold it said, Brown was an All-Buckeye Conference forward in basketball during his playing career at Ohio and at one time held the school marks in both the shotput and discus track events. He was a hero in one of Ohio's all-time great football victories, a 14-0 decision over Navy in 1932. He has been a coach, teacher and administrator in Ohio public schools since 1933 and is presently Superintendent of Schools in Miamisburg, O.

Athens Messenger, Wed. April 19. 1967, page 21:

GW's To Honor Former Coaches
A pair of former Gallipolis High School coaches, one a native of Mason, W. Va., will be honored by the Green and White Club of Athens at its seventh annual sports recognition banquet at Baker Center Thursday.
Speaker for the affair, at which 12 persons, two posthumously, will be honored, is Adolph Rupp, cage coach at the University of Kentucky, Jimmy Crum, sports director of WLW-C television, Columbus will be master of ceremonies.
Among those being honored will be Harold Brown, a native of Mason, W. Va., currently superintendent of schools at Miamisburg, Ohio, and James Halderman, now in a supervisory capacity in the Shaker Heights, Ohio, school system.
Brown attended Parkersburg W. Va., High School and Ohio University, earning a total of eight letters in three sports, basketball, football and track at Ohio U., plus a master's degree.
He was an all-Buckeye Conference forward in basketball and played on conference championship teams in all three sports. One of his most memorable moments was when he was awarded the game ball after Ohio's football victory over Navy in 1932.
Brown spent 22 years at Gallipolis High School, including four as head basketball coach and 13 as principal. For six years he was clinic manager at the Gallipolis clinic.
He has now been with the Miamisburg schools for six years, four as superintendent.
Brown was elected to Ohio University's athletic Hall of Fame in 1966.

This is something else!!
The Green and White Club Recognition Banquet was on April 20, 1967 at the Baker Center, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Harold was one of the honorees. The biographical blurb on the back of the program said this about M. Harold Brown:

This native West Virginian possesses the distinction of being an illustrious alumnus of Ohio University and attaining greatness while participating in collegiate sports. Presently, Superintendent with the Miamisburg schools. He excelled in football, basketball and track, earned 8 Varsty letters, and played on 4 Buckeye Conference Championship teams. ‎(Football, basketball and track)‎. In 1931 and 1933 he was an All-Buckeye Conference forward in basketball. After Ohio University's football victory over Navy in 1932 he was awarded the game ball. In 1966 he was elected to Ohio University's Hall of Fame.

Harold's speech at the induction:

Ladies and gentlemen:
I remember my years of participation in OU athletics with an assortment of feelings and thoughts.
The predominant feeling is related to my good fortune. I was very fortunate in several ways:
a. To go to college. To go to OU.
b. To play in a good, tough league which the Buckeye Conference was.
c. To be A.U. when many good athletes were there.
d. To work under the guidance, teaching and influence of such outstanding men as Don Peden, Butch Grover, Bill Herbert, Dutch Trautwein and others.
e. To participate in purposeful, well-organized and successful operations such as occurred in those years.
f. To have men of the calibre of Dr. Blaine Goldsberry and Thor Olsen to help me to be in good physical condition week after week.

Those were great years. I am happy to have been here at that time.

Needless to say, I am extremely proud to be elected to O.U.'s Hall of Fame.
Newspaper Article The Miamisburg News
M. HAROLD BROWN RESIGNS TO ACCEPT TWO YEAR ASSIGNMENT IN VIETNAM
by Mady Ransdell
M. Harold Brown, Miamisburg School Superintendent, will resign effective June 30 in order to accept a two year assignment with the Ohio University education project in Vietnam.
Superintendent here for the past four years, Brown will serve as general education advisor assigned to the development of ten new comprehensive secondary schools to be located throughout Vietnam. He will be based in Saigon and is slated to begin his assignment in early July.

Ohio University has conducted education assistance programs in Vietnam under contract with the U.S. Agency for International Development since 1962 and has helped develop demonstration high schools in connection with teacher education programs at the universities of Hue, Saigon and Can Tho.
Brown said that the ten principals who will serve the new schools have been studying and traveling to observe in the United States along with several members of the Education Ministry of Vietnam. The project will involve the remodeling of some buildings and "starting from scratch' in the case of others.

The educator will be located in the office of Don Knox, Chief of Party, Ohio University, Contract, 97 Hong Thap Thu, Saigon.
Mrs. Brown and their daughter Martha will join Brown in September in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, said to be "safe haven" for dependents of Ohio University technicians stationed in Vietnam. The family will be able to be together every month or six week. Kuala Lumpur is a city of British influence, about the size of Dayton.

A graduate of Ohio University, Brown holds a Bachelor of Arts degree and Master of Education. From 1933 to 1942 he was a commercial teacher at Gallia Academy High School in Gallipolis, Ohio and was named principal there in 1942, a position he held until 1955. In that year he accepted the position of principal of the Intermediate School. He returned to Gallipolis and was business manager of the Gallipolis Clinic for six years. In 1962 Brown was named assistant superintendent of the Miamisburg School System and in 1963, became superintendent following Frank Young in that position.

Last fall, Brown was honored by Ohio University when he was named to the Athletic Hall of Fame of the University. He holds eight varsity letters from 1929 to 1933--three in basketball, three in track and two in football. He was elected to the All Buckeye Conference and is credited with a first in shot put and discus at the Conference.

In addition, he earned two titles in track and is acclaimed as the hero of a 14-0 football victory over Navy during his college career.
He is also a member of the Green and White.
Biographical Notes Roast 'n Toast - quips from Don Foglesong
Greetings from your first grade teacher, Miss Lena Gibbs. She couldn't come but wanted me to tell you how proud she has always been of you.

Harold has always been a great conservationist. He conserved his money, and he conserved his energy. ‎(Don would have given humorous examples of these traits.)‎

Harold was great in many sports, football, basketball, track; but he never played his best sport--baseball. He would have become a major leaguer for sure.

This is but a hint of Don's highly entertaining speech.

I have known Harold longer than anyone except a previous speaker his sister, ‎(Evelyn Foglesong Proffitt)‎. The only reason for that is that she is older than I.

Roast 'n Toast - Harold's Response
I found a paper from The Procter & Gamble Company, October 11, 1977, on which Harold sketchily wrote some notes for a response to his roast & toast at the Shrine Club.

"Your kind remarks are good for my ego. If I ever go to trial, I would like to have some of you people on the jury. When judgment day comes, I'd like to engage some of you to speak to St. Peter on my behalf.

To receive recognition has tremendous effect on some people. Such as on me! Now, I'll have to try to do better for the rest of my life than I really planned to do.

My favorite girlfriend--Eloise Niday Brown. She really looks after me, babies me, is very good to me. Each of us is very fond of the other. Over the 41+ years that we have been married, she has made it a point to be critical when she felt it was necessary. The trouble is--she has thought criticism was necessary so often.

During my working years as teacher, high school principal, middle school principal, clinic manager, assistant superintendent of schools, superintendent, work with Ohio University, the State Department of Education and Gallipolis city manager, I think that the toughest but most satisfying work was that of high school principal. I felt that perhaps one of my worthwhile efforts was in the area of counselling boys about their problems, goals, relationships, and the years ahead.

I am not as good as some of you say I am; and I'm not as bad as some of you think I am.

In December a visitor came into my office, a man of about 55 years. He said, "The dignity you had, the respect you earned, the way you dealt with me, caused me to want to model myself after you." I was on cloud nine--thanks!

Now for being so good to me this evening and over the years, thank you very much. I am very grateful."

Roast 'n Toast - Two Women
"I would like to mention two women who had a great influence on my early years, my mother Willie Ruttencutter Brown and her sister Martha Katharine Ruttencutter Foglesong--Katie. There were five of us children ‎[Harold and Max Brown and Evelyn, Don & Sam Foglesong]‎. Our mothers always seemed to have us under control, to know where we were and what we were doing.

They had a puritan approach: no card playing excepting Rook and Old Maid and no drinking except water and milk ‎(carbonated drinks might lead to something worse)‎. As a result, I did not smoke or drink until the age of 22. While in college I learned to play cards and now love to play bridge.

As a boy growing up and going to school back in the 1920s, our family was not economically well off; but I didn't feel deprived. I did have considerable doubt about going to college, even though I took a college preparatory course. I was extremely pleased, therefore, to be invited to O.U. on an athletic scholarship of a sort which enabled me to earn board and room. The tuition fees were $40 a semester." ‎[What Harold didn't mention was that he supplemented his income by becoming a very good poker player!]‎
Biographical Notes Martha interviewed Harold
In Harold's pre-school years his parents lived in several places because of Miles' work with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. They lived in Wheeling, McMechen, and near Kaiser, West Virginia and Baltimore, Maryland.

Harold went to first grade in Mason, West Virginia. It was the time of World War I, and Miles had a government job in Nitro, West Virginia. I'm sure that Willie enjoyed being near her relatives in Mason City. Harold was about in third grade when the family moved back to Parkersburg. Miles was with the B&O. They lived in several different houses, all rented: Teft Street, 2410 Lyn Street, 1805 20th Street ‎(lived there longest--from 5th grade until university)‎, 19th St. and 22nd St.

In Parkersburg Harold attended Jefferson Elementary School. He later went to McKinley School where he finished 6th grade. Grades 7 to 8 were in downtown Parkersburg, so Harold either rode his bicycle or took a streetcar. He attended high school at Parkersburg High, which he really enjoyed. In his neighborhood there was a group of boys interested in sports. They played as a team and had competitions. Harold said he learned at an early age to play well and hard and to win.

Harold finished high school in 1929 and went to work as a laborer for the B&O railroad in the same general area where his dad Miles was a car foreman. He hoped to be able to go to college, but was uncertain about how to pay for it. I'm not sure how it happened, but Harold received an athletics scholarship which would pay for his school fees.

Harold went to Athens to work his way through college, which he did by working at various jobs and by playing poker. Butch Grover, his OU coach, encouraged Harold, and Harold didn't let him down. Harold's athletics schedule included football, basketball, and track events ‎(100 M dash & hurdles, javelin, discus)‎.
Harold did have a social life because he pledged Delta Tau Delta and lived in the house.

When Harold graduated from OU, he was offered a job as a teacher and coach at Gallia Academy High School in Gallipolis, Ohio, which he accepted. For nine years from 1933 to 1942 he taught there. He earned between $1120 to 1800. He decided to become a high school principal because a principal earned more money and could expect better pay increases. It was another challenge for better money. He did a Masters degree in Education to qualify for principal. His largest salary as principal was $4,800 a year.

By 1936 Harold had married Eloise Niday and in 1941 they had a daughter, Martha Katharine Brown, "the sweetest girl in town," Harold used to say.

In 1955 the Browns moved to Miamisburg, Ohio, near Dayton where Harold earned $5,800 as an intermediate school principal. In 1956 they returned to Gallipolis where Harold was manager of the Gallipolis Medical Clinic at the startling salary of $7,500. In 1962 he returned to Miamisburg to become assistant superintendent of schools. The next year when Mr. Young retired, he became superintendent.

In 1966 Harold was inducted into the Ohio University Hall of Fame in recognition for his outstanding athletic achievements.

In 1967 Harold was phoned by Gil Stephenson from Ohio University to ask if he would consider joining an OU team of educators who would work for USAID in Vietnam. He said he would.

From 1967 until 1970 Harold worked in Vietnam, often under trying circumstances. He was most fortunate to have been in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with Eloise during the Tet offensive of 1968. Eloise lived with the other wives in Kuala Lumpur because Vietnam was not safe for families.

In 1970 the Ohio State Department of Education invited Harold to be an adviser, a specialist in secondary education. He was asked to evaluate schools. He did that for one year and then retired. He was very ready for retirement, having worked so long and so hard for what seemed so little! By this time Harold and Eloise were again living in Gallipolis among their old friends and relatives.

During 1973 and 1977 Harold as asked if he would be interim manager of the city of Galliipolis. Gallipolis was in a bad financial condition. Harold did a good job.

The Browns spent their winters in Fort Myers, Florida, where they enjoyed playing golf and bridge and socializing with their friends. Harold discovered lapidary and polished stones to make jewellery. Martha sent him some opal from Australia. They moved to Fort Myers permanently in 1979 when Harold was diagnosed with a serious disease, periarteritis nodosa. The weather was better for him, and the medical facilities were good.

In the meantime Harold's daughter Martha had married David Shepherd and lived in Adelaide, South Australia. Harold and Eloise's two granddaughters, Katharine ‎(1970)‎ and Sarah ‎(1973)‎ lived down-under. Harold and Eloise made many trips to Australia, even when Harold was ill and had to have kidney dialysis in Adelaide. Martha and the children also visited Harold and Eloise in Ohio and Florida. They saw a lot of each other considering how far apart they lived.

Harold died, aged 72, on 11 November 1983 in Fort Myers, Florida. Eloise and Martha took his ashes back to Point Pleasant, West Virginia, for burial next to his beloved parents, brother ‎(Max)‎ and nephew ‎(David Harold)‎.
Letters from Harold W. Piggott Sr
Harold W. Piggott Sr.
504 Ruxton Drive
Wilmington, Del. 19809
Phone: 746-7560
7-24-82
Dear Harold,
I believe it has been 53 years since I have seen you, but I have thought of you often.
Paul Matheny showed me your letter to him, so I'm writing you to express my good wishes for you and yours.
Your P.H.S. class of '29 was a wonderful class and I think you have honored them in your life. One week ago, July 17, 8 of my P.H.S. class of 1912 got together for our 70th Reunion! How about that?
One week ago, July 17, the members of the State Champion P.H.S. football team of 1927 had their 55th Reunion. There were 18 present and I was privileged to be there in spite of the fact that I'll be 90 on Sept. 11. We had a wonderful time.
In memory of a fine school, of your fine class of 29 and of your contribution, I salute you.
May God bless you
Sincerely,
H.W. Piggott
Newspaper Article The Sport Beacon ‎(feature)‎
Adequate proof that one cannot judge the ability of an athlete by his appearance is provided in the story of a Parkersburg high school lad who had little more than fair success with Big Red teams--then went to Ohio University and became one of the Bobcats' most valued all-round athletes.

The lad of whom we speak was Harold Brown, who was in several of our classes in P.H.S. ‎[Parkersburg High School]‎ quiet, reserved and unusually studious. Harold hardly could have been regarded as the type that was destined to become a star on college basketball, football and track teams. Yet, during his four years at the Athens institution, he developed into one of the greatest stars ever to have graduated from P.H.S.

Many of the high school boys regarded Brown as more or less of a teachers' pet'--much too studious to join the ranks of the immortals of track and gridiron fame. But those teachers' pets deserve more than a passing glance, for they usually have the intelligence to learn quickly intricate plays and form required of a successful athlete. One can also find in them the persistence to strive until they have developed their maximum capabilities.

That same Harold Brown captured the Buckeye Conference shot put record, but he learned before he was graduated that no matter how good you are, you're apt to run into a fellow who is better.

One afternoon during spring track and field practice Harold was tossing the shot put near his conference record for the 16-ounce ball and a young freshman in street attire was among those looking on.

"Let me try that thing once," he asked. Brown gave him the heavy metal sphere.
The young freshman stripped off his coat and outdid Brown's best efforts. The freshman possessed practically no form, but made his shot puts solely with the strength of his arm. Needless to say, the coach did not lose any time in obtaining the freshman's name and signing him for the team. His name was Paul Halleck, a name that may represent America's hopes in that event in the Olympics this year. During his college career, Halleck has been defeated in the toss but once ‎(one inch)‎ his conqueror being Don Elser, Notre Dame's ace.
Letters Sympathy card from Vivian Wood
Dear Eloise & Martha:
Harold was such a good man and helped so many young lives to a better Life here on Earth. He was quiet and sincere in all his dealings with Youth. Be thankful you had so many happy years. He strengthened all our faith in the plans of our Master. We shall miss him but think of his great influence here on Earth with our Young.
God give you His richest blessings.
Love, Vivian
Newspaper Article Seven Lakes Newspaper
Know your neighbor
Malaysia a "safe haven" for Browns, and an exciting one
by Mel Powers
Seven Lakes staff
Gallipolis ‎(pronounced galley-police)‎ Ohio is the hometown of Eloise and Harold Brown. One of the oldest towns in Ohio, it was settled by a group of French people in 1790 and its name denotes "city of the Gauls."
During his long career in education, Harold was first a teacher, then a high school principal and later superintendent of schools. Eloise divulged that in 1930 while attending Ohio University Harold did most of the passing and kicking in a football game against Navy. Ohio won 14-0 and the newspaper headlines proclaimed "Brown Beats Navy." An outstanding athlete in football, basketball and track, Harold Brown was inducted into the Ohio University Hall of Fame.
From 1967-70 Harold was among a team of 16 people from Ohio University sent to Vietnam under a contract between the University and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Their services were related to developing secondary education and a teacher training program at the university level.
while Eloise and their daughter Martha could not accompany him on this assignment, it was necessary for them to live in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, a "safe haven" for families of men working inVietnam. They found it an exciting experience to live among the three distinct cultures of the Original Malaysians, the Chinese and the Indians, each of whom had their own food and special festivities.
Since their daughter married a native Australian and lives in Adelaide, the Browns library contains many books about that continent and they have visited Australia several times. They reside in building 2, apartment 208.

Harold Brown died November 11, 1983. When we met last Spring he graciously agreed to talk of his past experiences. It was a privilege to have known, though briefly, this very special man.

View Notes for ...


Sources

Source
Government Records
Citation Details:  Copy of birth certificate West Virginia, Mason Co.; marriage & death ‎(Florida)‎
Newspaper Article Athens Messenger
Wedding Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Citation Details:  30 Jul 1936
Wedding Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Citation Details:  30 Jul 1936
Wedding Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Citation Details:  30 Jul 1936
Newspaper Article Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Newspaper Article Miamisburg News
Newspaper Article Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Biographical Notes Athens Messenger
Newspaper Article Miamisburg News

View Sources for ...


Media

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1956 Harold Brown1956 Harold Brown  ‎(M4)‎
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1945 Garfield Ave Harold, Martha, Willie, Miles Brown1945 Garfield Ave Harold, Martha, Willie, Miles Brown  ‎(M595)‎
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1935 Gallipolis - Harold and Eloise Brown1935 Gallipolis - Harold and Eloise Brown  ‎(M581)‎
Type: Photo

Martha Eloise NIDAY

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1936 Eloise, Harold Brown1936 Eloise, Harold Brown  ‎(M582)‎
Type: Photo

Martha Eloise NIDAY

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1936 Mason - Wedding - Eloise Niday, Harold Brown1936 Mason - Wedding - Eloise Niday, Harold Brown  ‎(M583)‎
Type: Photo

Martha Eloise NIDAY

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1936 Mason WV Wedding Seal1936 Mason WV Wedding Seal  ‎(M586)‎
Type: Certificate

Martha Eloise NIDAY

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1936 Society Wedding1936 Society Wedding  ‎(M587)‎
Type: Newspaper

Martha Eloise NIDAY
View Media for ...


Family with Parents
Father
Miles Oscar BROWN ‎(I9)‎
Birth 28 May 1881 46 40 Hartford, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Death 25 October 1957 ‎(Age 76)‎ Holzer Medical Center, Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA
9 years
Mother
 
Willie Frances RUTTENCUTTER ‎(I10)‎
Birth 18 December 1889 31 32 Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Death 13 December 1978 ‎(Age 88)‎ Gallia County, Ohio, USA

Marriage: 22 June 1910 -- Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
13 months
#1
Miles Harold BROWN ‎(I4)‎
Birth 16 July 1911 30 21 Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Death 11 November 1983 ‎(Age 72)‎ Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida, USA
5 years
#2
Brother
Max David BROWN ‎(I11)‎
Birth 3 June 1916 35 26 Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Death 8 April 1975 ‎(Age 58)‎ Jenkintown, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA
Family with Martha Eloise NIDAY
Miles Harold BROWN ‎(I4)‎
Birth 16 July 1911 30 21 Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Death 11 November 1983 ‎(Age 72)‎ Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida, USA
4 years
Wife
 
Martha Eloise NIDAY ‎(I3)‎
Birth 27 September 1915 41 30 Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia, USA
Death 22 December 2002 ‎(Age 87)‎ Malvern, South Australia, Australia

Marriage: 29 July 1936 -- Mason, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
5 years
#1
Daughter
Martha Katharine BROWN ‎(I2)‎
Birth 30 October 1941 30 26 Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, USA
Death 25 August 2014 ‎(Age 72)‎ Mary Potter Hospice, 89 Strangways Terrace, North Adelaide, South Australia, Australia